Bacon and Shakespeare: His Position as Regards the Plays, Etc

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Skeffington, 1884 - 38 pages
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Page 37 - But may be termed the worst of all the three ? Domestic cares afflict the husband's bed, Or pains his head: Those that live single take it for a curse, Or do things worse...
Page 38 - Some would have children : those that have them, moan Or wish them gone: What is it, then, to have, or have no wife, But single thraldom, or a double strife? Our own affections still at home to please Is a disease: To cross the seas to any foreign soil, Peril and toil: Wars with their noise affright us ; when they cease, We are worse in peace; — What then remains, but that we still should cry For being born, or, being born, to die?
Page 38 - Some would have children ; those that have them, moan Or wish them gone : What is it, then, to have, or have no wife, But single thraldom, or a double strife? Our own affections still at home to please Is a disease : To cross the seas to any foreign soil Peril and toil ; Wars with their noise affright us; when they cease, We're worse in peace ; What then remains, but that we still should cry Not to be born, or, being born, to die?
Page 25 - As first he made low shifts, would pick and glean, Buy the reversion of old plays; now grown To a little wealth, and credit in the scene, He takes up all, makes each man's wit his own, And told of this, he slights it. Tut, such crimes, The sluggish gaping auditor devours, He marks not whose 'twas first: and after times May judge it to be his as well as ours. Fool! as if half eyes would not know a fleece From locks of wool, or shreds from the whole piece ? How much can the historian finally infer...
Page 37 - The world's a bubble and the Life of Man Less than a span In his conception wretched, from the womb So to the tomb; Curst from his cradle, and brought up to years With cares and fears. Who then to frail mortality shall trust, But limns on water, or but writes in dust. Yet...
Page 37 - Domestic cares afflict the husband's bed, Or pains his head : Those that live single, take it for a curse, Or do things worse : Some would have children ; those that have them, moan, Or wish them gone : What is it, then, to have, or have no wife, But single thraldom, or a double strife...
Page 11 - We know of him as much as we do of Homer. Did he write half the plays attributed to him ? Did he ever write a single whole play? I doubt it. He appears to me to have been an inspired adapter for the theatres, which were then not as good as barns. I take him to have been a botcher up of old plays. His popularity is of modern date, and it may not last; it would have surprised him marvellously. Heaven knows, at present, all that bears his name is alike admired; and a regular Shaksperian falls into ecstasies...
Page 36 - From thunder's violence. He only can behold With unaffrighted eyes The horrors of the deep, And terrors of the skies.
Page 33 - Elizabeth* ; and if so, it is probably one of the earliest evidences of the growth of Shakespeare's personal fame as a dramatic author ; the beginning of which cannot be dated much earlier than 1598. It was not until 1597 that any of his plays appeared in print ; and though the earliest editions of...
Page 15 - And 10. My friend Ben Jonson, equal to any of the antients for the exactness of his pen, and the decorum which he kept in the dramatic Poems never before observed on the English Stage.

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