Bacteria

Front Cover
W. Wood, 1883 - Bacteriology - 494 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 413 - A method by which the vaccine contagion may be cultivated apart from the animal body, in some medium or media not otherwise zymotic ; the method to be such that the contagium may by means of it be multiplied to an indefinite extent in successive generations, and that the product after any number of such generations shall (so far as can within the time be tested) prove itself of identical potency with standard vaccine lymph.
Page 248 - I am endeavoring to elucidate is that, during a nonfatal attack of one of the specific diseases, the cellular elements implicated which do not succumb to the destructive influence of the poison acquire a tolerance to this poison •which is transmissible to their progeny, and which is the reason of the exemption which the individual enjoys from future attacks of the same disease.
Page 193 - ... usual manner, a few drops of the stain are poured into a test-tube and warmed ; as soon as steam rises pour into a watch-glass, and place the cover-glass on the stain. Allow it to remain for four or five minutes, then wash in methylated spirit until no more color comes away ; drain thoroughly and dry, either in the air or over a spirit-lamp. Mount in Canada balsam. The whole process, after the sputum is dried, need not take more than six or seven minutes.
Page 192 - Take of rosanilin hydrochloride two grammes, methyl blue one gramme ; rub them up in a glass mortar. Then dissolve anilin oil 3 cc in rectified spirit 15 cc ; add the spirit slowly to the stains until all is dissolved, then slowly add distilled water 15 cc ; keep in a stoppered bottle. To use the stain : The sputum having been dried on the cover-glass in the usual manner, a few drops of the stain are poured into a test-tube and warmed ; as soon as steam rises pour into a watch-glass, and place the...
Page 323 - Tommasi-Crudeli; but there is no satisfactory evidence that these or any other of the bacterial organisms found in such situations, when injected beneath the skin of a rabbit, give rise to a malarial fever corresponding with the ordinary paludal fevers to which man is subject.
Page 324 - Bacillus malaria, or some other of the minute organisms associated with it, is not the active agent in the causation of malarial fevers in man. On the other hand there are many circumstances in favor of the hypothesis that the etiology of these fevers is connected directly or indirectly, with the presence of these organisms or their germs in the air and water of malarial localities.
Page 192 - The. great advantage consists in doing away with the use of nitric acid. The stain is made as follows : Take of rosanilin hydrochloride two grammes, methyl blue one gramme ; rub them up in a glass mortar. Then dissolve anilin oil 3 cc in rectified spirit 15 cc ; add the spirit slowly to the stains until all is dissolved, then slowly add distilled water 15 cc ; keep in a stoppered bottle.
Page 276 - All the larger vessels, even the arteries and veins of an intestinal villus, are either not stained at all or have but a light blue streak in their interior, and that only here and there. When magnified 250 times one can see that the blue capillary net-work is composed of numerous delicate rods, and when a power of 700 diameters is used, it is found that the apparent injection is nothing more or less than the Bacillus anthracis, stained dark blue, and present in incredible numbers in the whole capillary...
Page 125 - In order to render these numbers more comprehensible, let us seek the volume and the weight which may result from the multiplication of a single bacterium. The individuals of the most common species of rod-bacteria present the form of a short cylinder having a diameter of a thousandth of a millimeter, and in the vicinity of one five hundredth of a millimetre in length.
Page 323 - ... because changes in the spleen such as they describe are not evidence of death from malarial fever, inasmuch as similar changes occur in the spleens of rabbits dead from septicaemia produced by the subcutaneous injection of human saliva ;* (d) because the presence of...

Bibliographic information