BAD BLOOD: Parole ... For A Murderer?

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Trafford Publishing, May 16, 2011 - Fiction - 540 pages
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Perhaps you've heard of Richard Speck. He'd murdered eight nurses, in Chicago, in 1965. He was caught, tried, convicted. Sentenced to death. In 1972, The Supreme Court decided that capital punishment was "cruel and unusual punishment". All death sentences were commuted to Life Imprisonment. In Illinois, Speck became eligible for parole in 1976. In Bad Blood, Wessley H. Burleson kills "only" four stewardesses -- and rapes a fifth. He is caught, tried, convicted. Sentenced to death. His sentence also becomes life. When his case comes up, he is granted parole. He leads the authorities on a merry chase -- leaving a deadly path of human debris in his wake.
 

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Contents

ONE
1
TWO
36
THREE
63
FOUR
85
FIVE
114
SIX
136
SEVEN
174
EIGHT
193
TWELVE
288
THIRTEEN
314
FOURTEEN
334
FIFTEEN
358
SIXTEEN
377
SEVENTEEN
406
EIGHTEEN
433
NINETEEN
459

NINE
220
TEN
247
ELEVEN
271
TWENTY
476
TWENTY ONE
504
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