Badenheim 1939

Front Cover
David R. Godine Publisher, 1980 - Fiction - 148 pages
4 Reviews
It is the spring of 1939. In months Europe will be Hitler's, and Baderheim, a resort town vaguely in the orbit of Vienna, is preparing for its annual summer season. Soon the vacationers arrive, as they always have, a sample of Jewish middle-class life. The story unfolds as matter-of-factly as a Chekhov play, its characters so deeply held by their defensive trivia that they manage to misconstrue every signal of their fate, until these signals take on the lineaments of disaster.
 

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User Review  - magicians_nephew - LibraryThing

Badenheim, 1939 (and that's the translator's title) is a book that I think either way went over my head or way under it. A group of Jews come to Badenheim for a summer music festival at a charming old ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - vplprl - LibraryThing

For years, vacationers have been coming to Badenheim in Austria for its pleasant air, charming atmosphere, and convivial social scene. In the summer of 1939 the city has taken on a darker mood. The ... Read full review

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Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
6
Section 3
11
Section 4
15
Section 5
17
Section 6
35
Section 7
39
Section 8
60
Section 11
77
Section 12
84
Section 13
96
Section 14
100
Section 15
106
Section 16
110
Section 17
112
Section 18
116

Section 9
64
Section 10
73
Section 19
129
Copyright

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About the author (1980)

Aharon Appelfeld, born in Czernovitz, Bukovina, in 1932, experienced a tortuous childhood. Imprisoned in a German concentration camp at the age of eight, Appelfeld escaped and wandered around the Ukrainian countryside for several years, eventually joining the Russian, and later the Israeli, armies. Later still, he studied philosophy at Hebrew University in Jerusalem. The Holocaust had a powerful effect on Appelfeld's life and works. Feelings and emotions associated with the survivors of the Holocaust, such as imminent doom, stunted his personal development, and fear pervaded Appelfeld's writing. "To the Land of the Cattails," "The Healer," and "Writing and the Holocaust" are a few of his many excellent works. Appelfeld taught Hebrew Literature for many years at Ben-Gurion University, Beersheba. His many awards include The Prime Minister's Prize for Creative Writing, two Anne Frank Literary Prizes, and the Israel Prize.

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