Badfellas

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Penguin UK, Oct 27, 2011 - True Crime - 496 pages
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Badfellas is the definitive account by Ireland's most respected crime writer and journalist, Paul Williams, of how organized crime evolved in Ireland over the past four decades.

Drawing on his vast inside knowledge of the criminal underworld, an unparalleled range of contacts and eye witness interviews, Williams provides a chilling insight into the godfathers and events - that have dominated gangland since the late 1960s.

Until the explosion of paramilitary violence in the 1970s, Ireland was a criminal backwater. However, petty criminals with dreams of the big time were quick to emulate the ruthless actions of the subversives. Organized crime took hold in Ireland and soon armed robberies, kidnappings and murder became commonplace.

After the introduction of heroin to Ireland by Dublin's Dunne family in the late 1970s, there was no going back. Badfellas traces how the hugely lucrative drug trade that then emerged led to the gang wars that have corroded communities and devastated countless lives. Badfellas describes in gripping detail the shocking depths to which the mobsters have sunk. Badfellas is essential reading for anyone who cares about keeping communities safe

 

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Contents

BADFELLAS
Introduction
PART ONE
2 Saor Eire
3 The Godfather
4 The Dunne Academy
5 The General
6 Turmoil
15 An Evil Empire is Born
16 A New Order
17 The Munster Mafia
18 The Watershed
19 The Penguin
20 The Peacemaker
21 The Vacuum
PART FOUR

PART TWO
8 Going Down
9 The Ultimate Price
10 The Jewellery Job
11 Murder in Gangland
12 The Kidnap Gangs
13 Crime Incorporated
PART THREE
23 A City under Siege
24 The Dapper Don
25 Marlos Story
26 The Dons Downfall
Illustrations
Acknowledgements
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

Paul Williams is Ireland's leading crime writer and one of its most respected journalists. Over two decades his courageous and ground-breaking investigative work has won him multiple awards. Williams has also researched, written and presented a number of major TV crime series. He is a registered member of the internationally respected Washington DC-based International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ). He is married with two children and lives in Dublin.

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