Bakers and Basques: A Social History of Bread in Mexico

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UNM Press, 2012 - History - 217 pages


Mexico City’s colorfulpanaderías(bakeries) have long been vital neighborhood institutions. They were also crucial sites where labor, subsistence, and politics collided. From the 1880s well into the twentieth century, Basque immigrants dominated the bread trade, to the detriment of small Mexican bakers. By taking us inside the panadería, into the heart of bread strikes, and through government halls, Robert Weis reveals why authorities and organized workers supported the so-called Spanish monopoly in ways that countered the promises of law and ideology. He tells the gritty story of how class struggle and the politics of food shaped the state and the market. More than a book about bread,Bakers and Basquesplaces food and labor at the center of the upheavals in Mexican history from independence to the aftermath of the Mexican Revolution.

 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Zelo y desvelo The Bread Monopoly and Late Colonial Market Reforms
11
A system that offends the hands of brothers Small Bakers and the Free Market in Independent Mexico
24
An uncle in America Chain Migration and the Spanish Monopoly
44
Dough Kneaded with Blood
62
We have no bread Hunger Opportunity and War
83
The Bakers Revolution
100
Unionists Tlalchicholes and Canasteros
124
Conclusion
147
Notes
153
Bibliography
185
Index
211
Back Cover
218
Copyright

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About the author (2012)

Robert Weis is assistant professor of history at the University of Northern Colorado.

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