Ballads and Songs of the Shanty-Boy

Front Cover
Genealogical Publishing Com, Dec 1, 1993 - Reference - 244 pages
1 Review
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

This book is a gem.
I have seen a note that Alan Lomax wrote to the head of the Library of Congress saying that 'Franz Rickaby was to lumberjacks as my father was to cowboys..."
This books shows
us why....not only are the lyrics and music included, but wonderful photographs of logging, a glossary of terms and an evocative introduction that captures the power of those days are included, too.
No wonder Carl Sandburg loved the book, too.
I understand Professor James Leary from UW+Madison will soon re-issue the book. I can't wait.
 

Selected pages

Contents

Jack Haggertys Flat River Girl
3
Gerrys Rocks
11
Jim Whalen
20
The Lost Jimmie Whalen
24
The Banks of the Little Eau Pleine
25
The Shantymans Alphabet
35
Save Your Money When You re Young
39
MichiganIO
41
The Fatal Oak
116
The River in the Pines
119
The Merry Shanty Boys
122
Silver Jack
125
Bung Yer Eye
127
Fragments of Shanty Songs
129
The Backwoodsman
132
Ole from Norway
134

The Shantymans Life
43
The Shantyboy and the Farmers Son
48
The Shantyboy on the Big Eau Claire
54
Ye Noble Big Pine Tree
62
The Little Brown Bulls
65
Jim Porters Shanty Song
69
The Three McFarlands
76
Ye Maidens of Ontario
79
The Falling of the Pine
82
The Pinery Boy
85
The Maineite in Pennsylvania
87
Driving Sawlogs on the Plover
89
Fred Sargents Shanty Song
92
On the Lac San Pierre
93
The Festive Lumberjack
95
The Crow Wing Drive
99
The M and I Googoo Eyes
101
The Hanging Limb
103
Harry Bail
110
Shanty Teamsters Marseillaise
113
Fair Charlotte
135
James Bird
139
The Cumberlands Crew1
140
The Hunters of Kaintucky
141
The Flying Cloud
145
The Clipper Ship Dreadnaught
150
Bold Daniel
153
Paul Jones the Privateer
156
Red Iron Ore
161
The Persians Crew
164
The Biglers Crew
168
Morrissey and the Russian Sailor
173
Heenan and Sayers
177
The Dying Soldier
182
Daniel Monroe
185
NOTES
189
GLOSSARY
233
INDEX OF TITLES
239
INDEX OF FIRST LINES
242
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page xv - Lived at the river's bend. The wages of her own true love The boss to her did pay, And the shanty boys for her made up A generous purse next day.
Page xxxiv - His height was about six feet one. His hair was inclined to be sandy, And his whiskers as red as the sun. His age was somewhere about thirty, He neither was foolish nor vain. He loved the bold Wisconsin river Was the reason he left the Eau Pleine.
Page xxxii - One evening last June as I rambled The green woods and valleys among, The mosquito's notes were melodious, And so was the whip-poor-will's song. The frogs in the marshes were croaking, The tree-toads were whistling for rain, And partridges round me were drumming, On the banks of the Little Eau Pleine.
Page xxxii - And tinging the treetops with red. My wandering feet bore me onward, Not caring whither they led. I happened to see a young schoolma'am. She mourned in a sorrowful strain, She mourned for a jolly young raftsman On the banks of the Little Eau Pleine.
Page xxxiii - I stepped up beside this young school-ma'am, And thus unto her I did say, "Why is it you're mourning so sadly While all nature is smiling and gay?" She said, "It is for a young raftsman For whom I so sadly complain. He has left me alone here to wander On the banks of the Little Eau Pleine.

References to this book

All Book Search results »

Bibliographic information