Bancroft, H.H. History of the Life of W: G. A Character Study

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1889 - 62 pages
 

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Page 15 - What do we want with this vast, worthless area? This region of savages and wild beasts, of deserts, of shifting sands and whirlwinds of dust, of cactus and prairie dogs? To what use could we ever hope to put these great deserts, or those endless mountain ranges, impenetrable and covered to their very base with eternal snow?
Page 61 - Extravagance with him was another word for injustice. Amidst all his business he found leisure to look into his affairs, well knowing that frugality is the support of charity. His intimacies were but few. It was his endeavour, as he thought the spirit of Christianity required, to dilate rather than to contract his affections ; yet where he professed a particular friendship he was a religious observer of its offices.
Page 15 - ... shifting sands and whirlwinds of dust, of cactus and prairie dogs? To what use could we ever hope to put these great deserts, or those endless mountain ranges, impenetrable and covered to their very base with eternal snow?
Page 58 - The pioneer army perpetually advances, reconnoitres, strikes to the front. Empire plants itself upon the trails. Agitation, creative energy, industry, throb throughout and animate this crowding deluge. Conclusive occupation, solidity, permanence, and a stern discipline, attend every movement and illustrate every camp. The American realizes that
Page 4 - The race that once went bravely forth To slay the wild boar in his den, Now meets the bigots in their wrath, And boldly claims the rights of men.
Page 61 - March, 1583, in the sixty-sixth year of his age, and was interred in his own church. As to his character. His person was tall and slender* in the ornament of which he was at no pains. He had a particular aversion to the fopperies of dress. In his diet he was very temperate, rather abstemious. His parts were very good i his imagination, memory, and judgment, were lively, retentive, and solid.
Page 61 - Jess of moroseness, or could mix more agreeably with whatever was innocent in common life. He had a most extraordinary skill in the art of managing a fortune. He considered himself barely as a steward for other people; and took care therefore that his own desires never exceeded what calm reason could justify. Extravagance with him was another word for injustice.
Page 57 - In geography the antithesis of the Old World, in society it is and will be the reverse. North America will rapidly attain to a population equalling that of the rest of the world combined : forming a single people, identical in manners, language, customs, and impulses: preserving the same civilization, the same religion : imbued with the same opinions, and having the same political liberties.
Page 31 - I have received from the president an appointment for you as lieutenant-colonel of the 3d regiment, and I suppose this is followed by a life service if you choose. Had you not better withdraw now and avail yourself of this appointment?
Page 3 - Gilpin took it} down, and in the course of his sermon said, "I hear there is one among you, who has even in this sacred place hung up a glove in defiance," and producing the glove said, "I challenge him to compete with me in acts of Christian charity.

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