Bangladesh: Whose Ideas, Whose Interests?

Front Cover
Intermediate Technology, 1994 - Bangladesh - 588 pages
0 Reviews
This book addresses, in the Bangladesh context, the fundamental processes of agrarian structural change and their gender implications, opportunities for wider participation by landless men and women in agricultural growth; the social implications of rural works and fish culture programmes; rural institutions and poverty alleviation; and broad institutional questions arising from the interaction between state, market and community (including NGOs) concerning corruption, good governance and the franchise state. Throughout the volume there is long-range, but grounded speculation which connects processes of 'urbanisation' to patterns of land use and shifting sets of opportunities for poor actors. The author concludes by offering eleven working principles as a guide through the development maze of poverty alleviation in Bangladesh.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Understanding and Practice
1
Exploitation and the Rural Poor
31
Rural Class Formation in Bangladesh 194080
100
Copyright

22 other sections not shown

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1994)

Pauline Dibben is Senior Lecturer in Human Resource Management at the Middlesex University Business School.
Geoffrey Wood is Professor of Comparative Human Resource Management at Middlesex University.
Ian Roper is a Lecturer in Human Resource Management at the Middlesex University Business School.

Bibliographic information