Bannock, beans, and black tea: memories of a Prince Edward Island childhood in the Great Depression

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Drawn and Quarterly, May 1, 2004 - Business & Economics - 120 pages
2 Reviews
A stark, brutally honest memoir illustrated by one of the world's great cartoonists. This is a gripping and poignant memoir recounting one boy's experiences of deprivation and poverty growing up in a rural farming village during the Great Depression. The short stories are written by John Gallant and illustrated by his son Seth, better know to many as the New Yorker illustrator and award-winning D+Q cartoonist behind the books It's a Good Life, If You Don't Weaken and the sumptuous Vernacular Drawings. Written with a concise honesty and clarity, the stories reveal the sad reality of a boy growing up in brutal social and economic conditions.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - gypsysmom - LibraryThing

I took this book out of the library because I wanted to read something set in PEI that wasn't written by L. M. Montgomery. Don't get me wrong; I am a fan of Montgomery's but I've read everything she ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - fmgee - LibraryThing

This book is a series of very short stories about the author growing up very poor on Prince Edward Island. It is a beautiful little book and wonderfully illustrated by the authors son. The book deals ... Read full review

About the author (2004)

John Gallant lives today in Prince Edward Island, where the stories in this book take place. Seth was born in 1962 in a rural Ontario town. Seth lives in Guelph, Ontario with five cats, a gigantic collection of vintage records, comic books, and 20th century Canadiana, and his very patient wife. He regularly contributes illustrations to The New Yorker and The National Post and recently provided the entire album artwork for Sony records singer-songwriter, Aimee Mann.

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