Banquet Given by the Learned Societies of Philadelphia at the American Academy of Music, September 17, 1887, Closing the Ceremonies in Commemoration of the Framing and Signing of the Constitution of the United States

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Committee, 1888 - Constitutional history - 86 pages
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Page 59 - We grant no dukedoms to the few, We hold like rights, and shall; — Equal on Sunday in the pew, On Monday in the mall, For what avail the plough or sail, Or land or life, if freedom fail?
Page 19 - The business being thus closed, the Members adjourned to the City Tavern, dined together and took a cordial leave of each other...
Page 42 - I wish it were possible, from this instance, to invent a method of embalming drowned persons in such a manner that they may be recalled to life at any period, however distant...
Page 64 - Welcome, friend of our fathers, to our shores! Happy are our eyes that behold those venerable features. Enjoy a triumph, such as never conqueror or monarch enjoyed, the assurance, that throughout America, there is not a bosom, which does not beat with joy and gratitude at the sound of your name.
Page 45 - ... occurred — steam and electricity have in these days converted each thoughtful Hamiltonian into a believer in the construction theories of Jefferson : while, nonetheless, events have at the same time conclusively shown that , in his own day Jefferson was wrong and Hamilton was right. * * * It is from the other side of the circle that danger is now to be anticipated; everything today centralizes itself; gravitation is the law. The centripetal force, unaided by government, working only through...
Page 36 - It isn't in the books. The Constitution is straining and cracking. But, after all, the Constitution was made for the people, and not the people for the Constitution.
Page 29 - The 2d section declares, that "the judicial power shall extend to all cases in law or equity, arising under this constitution, the laws of the United States, and the treaties made, or which shall be made, under their authority...
Page 46 - For forms of government let fools contest ; Whate'er is best administered is best : For modes of faith let graceless zealots fight ; His can't be wrong whose life is in the right...
Page 63 - If we make and preserve a treaty of amity, the great Anglo-Saxon race throughout the world will become a security for peace and a surety for the growth of constitutional liberty.
Page 19 - The business being thus closed, the members adjourned to the City Tavern, dined together, and took a cordial leave of each other. After which I returned to my lodgings, did some business with, and received the papers from, the secretary of the convention, and retired to meditate on the momentous work, which had been executed...

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