Barchester Towers

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Oxford University Press, 1996 - Fiction - 328 pages
40 Reviews
Barchester Towers (1857) is the second of the six Chronicles of Barsetshire, the work in which, after a ten years' apprenticeship, Trollope finally found his distinctive voice. In this his most popular novel, the chronicler continues the story of Mr. Harding and his daughter Eleanor, begun in The Warden, adding to his cast of characters that oily symbol of 'progress' Mr. Slope, the hen-pecked Dr. Proudie, and the amiable and breezy Stanhope family. Love, mammon, clerical in-fighting and promotion again figure prominently and comically, all centred on the magnificently imagined cathedral city of Barchester. The central questions of this moral comedy - Who will be warden? Who will be dean? Who will marry Eleanor? - are skilfully handled with the subtlety of ironic observation that has won Trollope such a wide and appreciative readership over the last 140 years. For this new edition, John Sutherland has contributed an introduction and extensive notes, as well as a chronology of the novel's composition and current events, and a note on Trollopian names.

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User Review  - tess_schoolmarm - LibraryThing

Barchester Towers is the 2nd in a series of 6 by Anthony Trollope. It, like The Warden is set in the fictional town of Barsetshire. This book is a serious satire on The Church of England as the much ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - nx74defiant - LibraryThing

Maybe I don't know enough about Church politics. I didn't really understand the references to the High Church. The Miniseries was very faithful to the book. I was glad Slope got a happy ending. I still didn't see why Eleanor was attracted to Mr. Arabin Read full review

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About the author (1996)

John Sutherland is Lord Northcliffe Professor of Modern English Literature at University College London. He is the editor of numerous works in World's Classics and is Associate Editor of the Oxford Popular Fiction series.

Sutherland's latest book, Is Heathcliff a Murderer?, in which he investigates 34 puzzles in nineteenth-century fiction, is to be published in World's Classics in April 1996.

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