Barchester Towers

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Dent, 1906 - Fiction - 462 pages
40 Reviews
Barchester Towers is the second of the Barsetshire novels, and follows The Warden. 'Emphatically its author's best novel.' George Saintsbury. 'There is in Barchester Towers, I swear, not a dull moment.' Sir Hugh Walpole

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User Review  - tess_schoolmarm - LibraryThing

Barchester Towers is the 2nd in a series of 6 by Anthony Trollope. It, like The Warden is set in the fictional town of Barsetshire. This book is a serious satire on The Church of England as the much ... Read full review

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User Review  - nx74defiant - LibraryThing

Maybe I don't know enough about Church politics. I didn't really understand the references to the High Church. The Miniseries was very faithful to the book. I was glad Slope got a happy ending. I still didn't see why Eleanor was attracted to Mr. Arabin Read full review

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Page 192 - Whosoever transgresseth, and abideth not in the doctrine of Christ, hath not God. He that abideth in the doctrine of Christ, he hath both the Father and the Son.
Page 27 - Blessed are the meek ; for they shall inherit the earth. " Blessed are the merciful ; for they shall obtain mercy. " Blessed are the pure in heart ; for they shall see God. " Blessed are the peace-makers ; for they shall be called the children of God.
Page 459 - Wilt thou have this Man to thy wedded husband, to live together after God's ordinance in the holy estate of Matrimony? Wilt thou obey him, and serve him, love, honour, and keep him in sickness and in health; and, forsaking all other, keep thee only unto him, so long as ye both shall live?
Page 121 - And here, perhaps, it may be allowed to the novelist to explain his views on a very important point in the art of telling tales.
Page 196 - I rather beseech thee, being such an one as Paul the aged, and now also a prisoner of Jesus Christ. I beseech thee for my son Onesimus, whom I have begotten in my bonds...
Page 192 - If there come any unto you, and bring not this doctrine, receive him not into your house, neither bid him God speed : for he that biddeth him God speed is partaker of his evil deeds.
Page 207 - Drew Priam's curtain in the dead of night, And would have told him, half his Troy was burn'd: But Priam found the fire, ere he his tongue, And I my Percy's death, ere thou report'st it.
Page 28 - His mouth is large, though his lips are thin and bloodless; and his big, prominent, pale brown eyes inspire anything but confidence. His nose, however, is his redeeming feature: it is pronounced, straight, and wellformed; though I myself should have liked it better did it not possess a somewhat spongy, porous appearance, as though it had been cleverly formed out of a red coloured cork.
Page 91 - always the same always equally adverse to impropriety of conduct of every description;' and she stalked back through the room again, following Mr Slope out of the door. The signora couldn't follow her, or she certainly would have done so. But she laughed loud, and sent the sound of it ringing through the lobby and down the stairs after Mrs Proudie's feet. Had she been as active as Grimaldi she could probably have taken no better revenge. 'Mr Slope...

About the author (1906)

Novelist Anthony Trollope was born in London, England on April 24, 1815. He attended many famous schools but as a large, awkward boy, he never felt in place among the aristocrats he met there. In 1834, he became a junior clerk in the General Post Office, London. He spent seven years there in poverty until his transfer, in 1841, to Banagher, Ireland as a deputy postal surveyor. He became more financially secure and in 1844, he married Rose Heseltine. He wanted to discover the reasons for Irish discontent. In 1843, he began working on his first novel The Macdermots of Ballycloran which was published in 1847. He was sent on many postal missions. He spent a year is Belfast, in 1853, then went to Donnybrook, near Dublin. He also went to Egypt, Scotland and the West Indies to finally settle outside of London, at Waltham Cross, as a surveyor general in the Post Office. At this point, he was writing constantly. Some of the writings during this time were The Noble Jilt, Barchester Towers, and The Last Chronicle of Barset. In 1867, he tried editorship of St. Paul's Magazine but soon gave up because he didn't feel suited for the job. In 1871, he went on a visit to a son in Australia. At sea, he wrote Lady Anna on the voyage out and Australia and New Zealand on the voyage back. The Autobiography was written between October 1875 and April 1876 but was not published until after his death. Suffering from asthma and possible angina pectoris, he moved to Harting Grange. He wrote three more novels during 1881 than, in 1882, went to Ireland to begin research for The Landleaguers. In November that year, he suffered a paralytic stroke and he died on December 6, 1882.

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