Barchester Towers

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Century Company, 1906 - 515 pages
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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - JBD1 - LibraryThing

After The Warden, another excellent visit to Barsetshire, and another book I had a difficult time putting down. Trollope improves here on his gentle wittiness, absolutely delightful small-scale ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Hagelstein - LibraryThing

The action, as it is, starts with the death of a bishop of The Church England in “the cathedral city of Barchester” in “the latter days of July in the year 185-.” The equilibrium thus upset, a new ... Read full review

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Page 212 - If there come any unto you, and bring not this doctrine, receive him not into your house, neither bid him God speed : for he that biddeth him God speed is partaker of his evil deeds.
Page 229 - Even such a man, so faint, so spiritless, So dull, so dead in look, so woe-begone, Drew Priam's curtain in the dead of night...
Page 28 - Blessed are the meek ; for they shall inherit the earth. " Blessed are the merciful ; for they shall obtain mercy.
Page 511 - Wilt thou have this Man to thy wedded husband, to live together after God's ordinance in the holy estate of Matrimony? Wilt thou obey him, and serve him, love, honour, and keep him in sickness and in health; and, forsaking all other, keep thee only unto him, so long as ye both shall live?
Page 216 - I rather beseech thee, being such an one as Paul the aged, and now also a prisoner of Jesus Christ. I beseech thee for my son Onesimus, whom I have begotten in my bonds...
Page 29 - His mouth is large, though his lips are thin and bloodless; and his big, prominent, pale brown eyes inspire anything but confidence. His nose, however, is his redeeming feature: it is pronounced straight and well-formed; though I myself should have liked it better did it not possess a somewhat spongy, porous appearance, as though it had been cleverly formed out of a red coloured cork. I never could endure to shake hands with Mr Slope. A cold, clammy perspiration always exudes from him, the small...
Page 132 - And here, perhaps, it may be allowed to the novelist to explain his views on a very important point in the art of telling tales. He ventures to reprobate that system which goes so far to violate all proper confidence between the author and his readers, by maintaining nearly to the end of the third volume a mystery as to the fate of their favourite personage ... Our doctrine is, that the author and the reader should move along together in full confidence with each other.
Page 132 - But let the gentle-hearted reader be under no apprehension whatsoever. It is not destined that Eleanor shall' marry Mr. Slope or Bertie Stanhope. And here, perhaps, it may be allowed to the novelist to explain his views on a very important point in the art of telling tales. He ventures to reprobate that system which goes so far to violate all proper confidence between the author and his readers, by maintaining nearly to the end of the third volume a mystery as to the fate of their favourite personage.
Page 3 - BE THE NEW BISHOP? In the latter days of July in the year 185-, a most important question was for ten days hourly asked in the cathedral city of Barchester, and answered every hour in various ways — Who was to be the new Bishop?
Page 90 - Unhand it, sir!" said Mrs. Proudie. From what scrap of dramatic poetry she had extracted the word cannot be said; but it must have rested on her memory, and now seemed opportunely dignified for the occasion. "I'll fly to the looms of the fairies to repair the damage, if you'll only forgive me," said Ethelbert, still on his knees.

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