Barnaby Rudge

Front Cover
Random House, Jan 31, 2011 - Fiction - 896 pages
9 Reviews

'One of Dickens's most neglected, but most rewarding, novels'
Peter Ackroyd

Barnaby Rudge is a young innocent simpleton who is devoted to his talkative raven, Grip. When he gets caught up in the mayhem of the Gordon riots and a mysterious unsolved murder, his life is put in jeopardy. Barnaby Rudge a powerful historical tale of treachery, forbidden love, abduction and the dangerous power of the mob.

 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Cecrow - LibraryThing

Dickens introduces this novel with several chapters of pure fiction set in 1775, laying out two romance plots and a murder mystery. Then the story jumps ahead five years to the Gordon Riots of 1780 ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - AliceAnna - LibraryThing

A mixture of fact and fiction and an indication of things yet to come. The historical perspective of A Tale of Two Cities plus a hint of future plot manipulation and twists and turns best exemplified ... Read full review

Contents

Sueeounng the Wounded
33
Mr Tippertits jealoug
46
Edward Chester Relates his Adventures
90
Mr Haredale Interrupts the Lovers
200
A high Interview
217
Old john Asleep in his Cog Bar 2 2 I
233
joe Bids Dotty Goodbye
270
Solomon Frightened hp 0 Ghost
286
Old johns Bodyguard
295
Another Protestant
327
A NoPopery Dance
339

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About the author (2011)

Charles Dickens was born on 7 February 1812 in Landport in Portsmouth. His father was a clerk in the Navy Pay Office who often ended up in financial trouble. When Dickens was twelve years' old he was sent to work in a shoe polish factory because his father had been imprisoned for debt.In 1833 he began to publish short stories and essays in newspapers and magazines. The Pickwick Papers, his first commercial success, was published in 1836, the same year that he married Catherine Hogarth. The serialisation of Oliver Twist began in 1837 while The Pickwick Papers was still running. Many other novels followed and Dickens became a celebrity in America as well as Britain. He also set up and edited the journals Household Words (1850-9) and All the Year Round (1859-70). Charles Dickens died on 9 June 1870 leaving his last novel, The Mystery of Edwin Drood, unfinished. He is buried in Westminster Abbey.

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