Barnaby Rudge

Front Cover
Wordsworth Editions, 1998 - Fiction - 648 pages
9 Reviews

Illustrations by Hablot K. Browne (Phiz) and George Cattermole, with a new Introduction by Cedric Watts, Research Professor of English, University of Sussex.

This vivid historical and political novel by Dickens is centred on the infamous 'No Popery' riots, instigated by Lord George Gordon, which terrorised London in 1780. Dickens' targets are prejudice, intolerance, religious bigotry and nationalistic fervour, together with the villains who exploit these for selfish ends.

His intense account of the riots is interwoven with the mysterious tale of a long-unsolved murder and with a romance involving forbidden love, treachery and heroism. Barnaby Rudge abounds in memorably strange, comic and grotesque characters. Furthermore, recent historical events have renewed its political topicality.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
1
4 stars
5
3 stars
3
2 stars
0
1 star
0

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Cecrow - LibraryThing

Dickens introduces this novel with several chapters of pure fiction set in 1775, laying out two romance plots and a murder mystery. Then the story jumps ahead five years to the Gordon Riots of 1780 ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - AliceAnna - LibraryThing

A mixture of fact and fiction and an indication of things yet to come. The historical perspective of A Tale of Two Cities plus a hint of future plot manipulation and twists and turns best exemplified ... Read full review

Contents

The Maypole ii
8
Succouring the wounded
38
Edward Chester relates his adventures
55
The secret society of Prentice Knights 7 3
72
The Maypoles state couch i o 7
98
Barnaby greets his mother
143
Mr Chester making an impression
217
Old John restrains his son
241
Mr Chesters Diplomacy
255
Distinguished guests at the Maypole
281
Another protestant
298
A chance meeting in Westminster Hall
339
The rioters headquarters
407
Barnaby taken prisoner
453
The ladies escort
467
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1998)

Charles Dickens, perhaps the best British novelist of the Victorian era, was born in Portsmouth, Hampshire, England on February 7, 1812. His happy early childhood was interrupted when his father was sent to debtors' prison, and young Dickens had to go to work in a factory at age twelve. Later, he took jobs as an office boy and journalist before publishing essays and stories in the 1830s. His first novel, The Pickwick Papers, made him a famous and popular author at the age of twenty-five. Subsequent works were published serially in periodicals and cemented his reputation as a master of colorful characterization, and as a harsh critic of social evils and corrupt institutions. His many books include Oliver Twist, David Copperfield, Bleak House, Great Expectations, Little Dorrit, A Christmas Carol, and A Tale of Two Cities. Dickens married Catherine Hogarth in 1836, and the couple had nine children before separating in 1858 when he began a long affair with Ellen Ternan, a young actress. Despite the scandal, Dickens remained a public figure, appearing often to read his fiction. He died in 1870, leaving his final novel, The Mystery of Edwin Drood, unfinished.

Bibliographic information