Barnaby Rudge: A Tale of the Riots of Eighty

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The Floating Press, Feb 1, 2010 - Fiction - 818 pages
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Renowned storyteller Charles Dickens takes on the historical novel in Barnaby Rudge, a gripping fictionalized account of the anti-Catholicism turmoil that rocked England in the late eighteenth century. The novel pairs Dickens' social insights into the "anti-papist" riots of 1780 with the quirky, closely observed characters that have won him a loyal following the world over.
 

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Contents

Chapter 42
584
Chapter 43
592
Chapter 44
610
Chapter 45
618
Chapter 46
635
Chapter 47
646
Chapter 48
660
Chapter 49
674

Chapter 8
120
Chapter 9
137
Chapter 10
147
Chapter 11
166
Chapter 12
175
Chapter 13
189
Chapter 14
207
Chapter 15
216
Chapter 16
232
Chapter 17
242
Chapter 18
260
Chapter 19
269
Chapter 20
286
Chapter 21
296
Chapter 22
311
Chapter 23
322
Chapter 24
340
Chapter 25
349
Chapter 26
365
Chapter 27
374
Chapter 28
393
Chapter 29
402
Chapter 30
421
Chapter 31
428
Chapter 32
446
Chapter 33
455
Chapter 34
472
Chapter 35
482
Chapter 36
501
Chapter 37
510
Chapter 38
528
Chapter 39
537
Chapter 40
553
Chapter 41
565
Chapter 50
691
Chapter 51
702
Chapter 52
719
Chapter 53
730
Chapter 54
745
Chapter 55
758
Chapter 56
771
Chapter 57
784
Chapter 58
799
Chapter 59
811
Chapter 60
830
Chapter 61
838
Chapter 62
849
Chapter 63
865
Chapter 64
880
Chapter 65
894
Chapter 66
910
Chapter 67
921
Chapter 68
938
Chapter 69
947
Chapter 70
965
Chapter 71
976
Chapter 72
993
Chapter 73
1003
Chapter 74
1020
Chapter 75
1032
Chapter 76
1050
Chapter 77
1059
Chapter 78
1078
Chapter 79
1088
Chapter 80
1103
Chapter 81
1116
Chapter the Last
1131
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Charles Dickens, perhaps the best British novelist of the Victorian era, was born in Portsmouth, Hampshire, England on February 7, 1812. His happy early childhood was interrupted when his father was sent to debtors' prison, and young Dickens had to go to work in a factory at age twelve. Later, he took jobs as an office boy and journalist before publishing essays and stories in the 1830s. His first novel, The Pickwick Papers, made him a famous and popular author at the age of twenty-five. Subsequent works were published serially in periodicals and cemented his reputation as a master of colorful characterization, and as a harsh critic of social evils and corrupt institutions. His many books include Oliver Twist, David Copperfield, Bleak House, Great Expectations, Little Dorrit, A Christmas Carol, and A Tale of Two Cities. Dickens married Catherine Hogarth in 1836, and the couple had nine children before separating in 1858 when he began a long affair with Ellen Ternan, a young actress. Despite the scandal, Dickens remained a public figure, appearing often to read his fiction. He died in 1870, leaving his final novel, The Mystery of Edwin Drood, unfinished.

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