Barnaby Rudge, Volume 1

Front Cover
Lea and Blanchard, 1842 - Gordon Riots, 1780 - 315 pages
9 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
1
4 stars
5
3 stars
3
2 stars
0
1 star
0

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Cecrow - LibraryThing

Dickens introduces this novel with several chapters of pure fiction set in 1775, laying out two romance plots and a murder mystery. Then the story jumps ahead five years to the Gordon Riots of 1780 ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - AliceAnna - LibraryThing

A mixture of fact and fiction and an indication of things yet to come. The historical perspective of A Tale of Two Cities plus a hint of future plot manipulation and twists and turns best exemplified ... Read full review

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 229 - ... There were men who rushed up to the fire, and paddled in it with their hands as if in water ; and others who were restrained by force from plunging in, to gratify their deadly longing. On the skull of one drunken lad — not twenty, by his looks — who lay upon the ground with a bottle to his mouth, the lead from the roof came streaming down in a shower of liquid fire, white hot ; melting his head like wax.
Page 173 - There he stood working at his anvil, his face all radiant with exercise and gladness, his sleeves turned up, his wig pushed off his shining forehead — the easiest, freest, happiest man in all the world.
Page 9 - Maypole — by which term, from henceforth is meant the house, and not its sign — the Maypole was an old building, with more gable-ends than a lazy man would care to count on a .sunny day ; huge zig-zag chimneys, out of which it seemed as though even smoke could not choose but come in more than naturally fantastic shapes, imparted to it in its tortuous progress ; and vast stables, gloomy, ruinous and empty.
Page 24 - ... face and shoulders, gave to his restless looks an expression quite unearthly — enhanced by the paleness of his complexion, and the glassy lustre of his large protruding eyes. Startling as his aspect was, the features were good, and there was something even plaintive in his wan and haggard aspect. But, the absence of the soul is far more terrible in a living man than in a dead one ; and in this unfortunate being its noblest powers were wanting.
Page 273 - ... and drank until they died. While some stooped with their lips to the brink and never raised their heads again, others sprang up from their fiery draught, and danced, half in a mad triumph, and half in the agony of suffocation, until they fell, and steeped their corpses in the liquor that had killed them.

Bibliographic information