Barriers and Biases in Computer-Mediated Knowledge Communication: And How They May Be Overcome

Front Cover
Springer Science & Business Media, Mar 29, 2005 - Computers - 331 pages
0 Reviews
We report a study of one aspect of the changing industrial landscape, the use of virtual team working in the supply chain. The supply chain is the group of companies that are involved in the design and manufacture and distribution of products, notably complex products such as cars. Supply chain partnerships often involve cross-company team working, and as members of such teams are rarely collocated, virtual team working supported by IT, offers considerable potential benefits. Companies hope that these technologies can be used to support distributed computer supported collaborative working for purposes such as concurrent engineering and it is this kind of virtual teaming which we decided to investigate. We believe that exploring how virtual teams communicate is an effective way of examining how well they are operating and identifying the impacts of the technologies on their interactions. In the workplace free and open communication is considered to be very important to organizations facing a rapidly changing business environment. Similarly free and equal communication among members has been reported to be important if genuine team working is to be implemented in the workplace, (Carletta et al., 1998). If organizations are to derive benefits such as innovative problem solving from virtual team working then such open communication seems desirable. Communications technologies such as videoconferencing, shared applications etc. clearly offer the possibilities of such communications among geographically distributed or virtual teams.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

COMMUNICATION AND COOPERATION WITH COMPUTERS INTRODUCTION AND OVERVIEW
1
Why biases
2
Why opportunities?
3
Three basic barrierpresumptions related to problems of communication and cooperation
4
63 The establishment and maintenance of motivation to cooperate and communicate
5
The chapters
6
A map for the localization of barriers biases and opportunities
12
References
14
References
165
ENHANCING SOCIABILITY OF COMPUTER SUPPORTED COLLABORATIVE LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS
169
An educational shift
170
Collaborative learning
171
32 The Social Basis for these Approaches
173
Social interaction in CSCL environments
175
Affordances
177
51 Technological affordances
178

CONSTRUCTION IN COMPUTERMEDIATED LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS WITH COOPERATION SCRIPTS
15
Computermediated learning environments
16
Facilitating collaborative knowledge construction
17
31 Facilitating Social and Epistemic Activities with Scripts
19
32 Social Cooperation Scripts for Collaborative Knowledge Construction
20
33 Epistemic Cooperation Scripts for Collaborative Knowledge Construction
21
Facilitating computermediated learning through scripts evidence from webbased discussion boards and videoconferencing
23
Facilitating Collaborative Knowledge Construction in a Videoconferencing Environment through Cooperation Scripts
29
Discussion
33
References
35
PRINCIPLES AND PERSPECTIVES
39
FacetoFace
40
12 Levels of Discourse
41
Variants of support
44
22 The Reduction Paradigm
46
3 A costeffort framework
49
31 The Costs of Grounding
50
33 Deciding to Ground
51
Perspectives
53
References
55
INSTRUCTIONAL SUPPORT FOR COLLABORATION IN DESKTOP VIDEOCONFERENCE SETTINGS
59
Challenges in computermediated collaboration
60
Complementary Expertise as a Basis for Collaboration
61
Overcoming the barriers How to achieve good collaboration
64
An Instructional Approach
65
Assessing collaboration How to test the effects of support measures
67
41 Assessing Collaborative Process
68
42 Assessing Joint Outcome
74
43 Assessing Individual Knowledge
75
51 Task Participants and Setting
76
53 Assessing the Dependent Variables
77
54 Summary and Discussion of Results
78
Instructional support measures and methods of assessment Lessons learned
80
62 Methods of Assessing Process and Outcome of Collaboration
81
63 Challenges Met Barriers Overcome Chances Realized?
83
References
84
BARRIERS AND BIASES IN COMPUTERMEDIATED EXPERTLAYPERSONCOMMUNICATION
89
Opportunities and barriers
90
Sources of adviceand mutual misunderstanding
92
Knowledge differences and mutual understanding in textbased asynchronous computer mediated communication
94
32 Some doubts about the cooperative nature of communication
96
Expertise and the design of written medical explanations studies on the use of the community membership heuristic and physical copresence heuristic...
97
Analyzing experts audience design
99
Studies with layperson samples
106
Synthesis
114
References
116
EXPLORING WHY VIRTUAL TEAMWORKING IS EFFECTIVE IN THE LAB BUT MORE DIFFICULT IN THE WORKPLACE
119
11 Overview of Chapter
120
Lab Study of Virtual Team Working
121
13 Discussion
125
Study 2 Workplace study of virtual teams
127
21 Background
128
22 Observing and Analysing Virtual Meetings
129
23 Observations from Virtual Team Meetings
130
Study 3 Simulation study of virtual team meetings
132
31 Method
133
32 Results
135
33 Discussion
137
Conclusion
138
References
140
SOCIAL DILEMMA IN KNOWLEDGE COMMUNICATION VIA SHARED DATABASES
143
Knowledge exchange as publicgoods dilemma
146
Experimental investigation of the database dilemma
149
32 Empirical results
153
33 Interpretation
156
Possible solutions to the communication dilemma
157
42 Structural solutions
161
Summary
164
52 Educational Affordances
179
53 Social Affordances
180
54 Affordances and Useful CSCLEnvironments
181
Operationalising social affordances Group awareness widgets
182
63 Set of Communication Media
183
64 Group Awareness Widgets
184
65 A First Prototype of the GAW
185
A study of the use of the GAW prototype
186
71 Method
187
References
188
KNOWLEDGE SHARING IN TEAMS OF HETEROGENEOUS EXPERTS
193
Policies of sharing knowledge
194
Method
195
The structure of a web design project
196
42 Subtask dependencies
199
a quasiexperiment
200
52 Examples of design options
202
Knowledgelevel modelling
203
61 Representing design decisions
204
Supporting the web design process
205
72 Interviews
207
Discussion
209
References
211
KNOWLEDGE COMMUNICATION IN DESIGN COMMUNITIES
213
Design and design communities
214
22 Design Communities
219
23 Boundary Objects
224
Media in support pf knowledge communication
225
32 ComputerMediated Communication in CoPs
227
33 ComputerMediated Communication in Cols
229
Lessons learned
236
Beyond Novices and Experts
237
Conclusions
238
References
239
DESIGNING BIASES THAT AUGMENT SOCIO COGNITIVE INTERACTIONS
243
The imitation bias
245
Augmenting social interaction
247
32 The context is stored with the message
249
33 The mirror for the group
251
34 Synthesis
255
41 How to support collaborative learning?
256
42 Shaping interactions with interfaces
257
43 Shaping interaction with scripts
258
References
261
HOW DO PEOPLE LEARN?
265
Data
268
Salicylate toxicity
275
Barriers and biases to understanding computermediated interaction
282
References
284
Transcription conventions
287
INTERSUBJECTIVE LEARNING AND HOW THEY MAY BE EXPLOITED
295
22 Computer Mediation
297
23 From Barriers and Biases to Affordances
298
Representational affordances as a central topic for CSCL
300
33 Representational Differences Lead to Biases
303
34 Experimental Evidence of Representational Affordances
304
Three approaches to the study of CSCL
306
42 Scaffolding Collaborative Learning to Remove Barriers
307
43 Understanding and Supporting Processes of intersubjective learning
309
Assessing the field
310
52 How do we study it? A call for methodological fusion
311
53 What Theory Drives the Research?
313
Conclusions
315
References
316
Name index
321
Subject Index
329
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book