Barry's Fruit Garden

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Orange Judd Company, 1888 - Fruit-culture - 516 pages
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Page 303 - ... situated been shortened, the whole nourishment being carried to the upper part of the branch. It is from these shoots that fruit is to be expected. These productive shoots will in a few years become very numerous, and many of them must be taken off, particularly the strongest, in order to encourage the production of the smaller ones ; for those of the former year become so exhausted that they generally decay ; but whether decayed or not they are always cut out by the pruner, and a fresh supply...
Page 116 - Laying in the strong parts obstructs the circulation of the sap in them, and consquently favors the weak parts that are loose. This is only applicable to espaliers. " 7. In espalier trees, giving the feeble parts the benefit of the light, and confining the strong parts more in the shade, restores a balance, for light is the agent which enables leaves to perform their functions and their action on the roots, and the parts receiving the greatest proportion of it acquire the most vigorous development.
Page 115 - The more erect the branches and stern are, the greater will be the flow of sap to the growing parts ; hence, the feeble parts being erect, attract much more sap than the strong parts inclined, and, consequently, make a more vigorous growth, and soon recover their balance. This remedy is more especially applied to espalier trees. " 4. Remove from the vigorous parts the superfluous shoots as early in the season as possible, and from the feeble parts as late as possible. The fewer the number of young...
Page 115 - Bend the strong parts and keep the weak erect. The more erect the branches and stem are, the greater will be the flow of sap to the growing parts; hence, the feeble parts being erect, attract much more sap than the strong parts inclined, and, consequently, make a more vigorous growth, and soon recover their balance. This remedy is more especially applied to espalier trees. " 4. Remove from the vigorous parts the superfluous shoots as early in the season as possible, and from the feeble parts cte...
Page 128 - ... it for the seeds. If the soil be very tough, and not fit to be turned up, a thorough harrowing or working with the horse hoe will do. Where large quantities are grown, the drills may be the same distance apart as that recommended for apples — three feet; but if only a few, twelve to eighteen inches will be sufficient, as the cleaning can be done with the hoe.
Page 98 - Fig. 38) is then made on the stock, an inch and a half long, another cut (b) is made across this cut, about half way down, as at point b; the stock is split on one side of the pith, by laying the chisel on the horizontal surface, and striking lightly with a mallet ; the split is kept open with the knife or chisel, till the scion is inserted with the thick side out (Fig.
Page 304 - ... per acre. When I reflected upon the reason of the failure happening so often as three years out of five, it occurred to me, that possibly it might arise from the excessive productiveness of the other two, the whole nourishment of the trees being expended in the production of the fruit ; and that, consequently, they might be unable properly to mature the blossom for the following year. We know that...
Page 302 - I would advis* every one to plant them 'where they are to remain, whether they are intended for a garden or a larger plantation : and after being suffered to grow without restraint for three or four years, to cut them down within a few inches of the ground. From the remaining part, if the trees are well rooted in the soil, five or six strong shoots will be produced.
Page 304 - Old trees are easily induced to bear in this manner, by selecting a sufficient number of the main branches, and then cutting the side shoots off nearly close, excepting any should be so situated as not to interfere with the others, and there should be no main branch directed to that particular part. It will, however, be two or three years before the full effect will be produced.
Page 113 - The theory of the pruning of fruit trees rests on the following six general principles: " 1. The vigor of a tree, subjected to pruning, depends, in a great measure, on the equal distribution of sap in all its branches.

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