Bartow

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Arcadia Publishing, 2013 - History - 127 pages
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Bartow, the city of oaks and azaleas, where history has come alive since 1851, holds a long and colorful history. Forests of oak and pine flank the tranquil stream, which was named Peace by the Spanish Conquistadors. The site, untouched except by the footprint of the Seminole and untamed wildlife, drew the pioneer Blount family to give permanence to a fledgling community by building a place of refuge. First called Fort Blount and alternately Peace Creek, the Civil War and the munificence of cattleman Jacob Summerlin denominated Bartow and ensured its establishment as the county seat of Polk County. Cattle, citrus, railroads, and phosphate, coupled with hard-working, enterprising citizens, provided the catalyst to economic independence. Through war, peace, depression, and boom, Bartow s history is reflected in its places and in the people whose deeds built a city in the wilderness. Images of America: Bartow contains a portrait of history in the continuing growth of a city unveiled by photographic images."
 

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Contents

Acknowledgments ODJQU1OOOOIO Introduction
7
18511884
9
18851890 OOOO1krlk 3 Progress 18911899
39
19001919
59
19201929
75
19301939
87
19401945
93
19461976 pL
109
Copyright

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About the author (2013)

William Lloyd Harris, Polk County historical commissioner and president emeritus of the Polk County Historical Association, is a local historian, retired soldier, teacher, and third-generation Bartowan. He has brought together early photographs from a wide variety of institutions and personal collections to exhibit the fascinating individual, corporate, and cultural development of Bartow through the 19th and 20th centuries.

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