Basic Writings of St. Thomas Aquinas, Volume 2

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Hackett Publishing, Sep 1, 1997 - Religion - 211 pages
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Includes substantial selections from the Second Part of the Summa Theologica and the Summa Contra Gentiles. Pegis's revision and correction of the English Dominican Translation renders Aquinas' technical terminology consistently as it conveys the directness and simplicity of Aquinas' writing; the Introduction, notes, and index aim at giving the text its proper historical setting, and the reader the means of studying St. Thomas within that setting.

 

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Contents

FOREWORD
3
THAT EVERY AGENT ACTS FOR AN END
5
THAT EVERY AGENT ACTS FOR A GOOD
7
THAT EVIL IS UNINTENTIONAL IN THINGS
9
56 ARGUMENTS THAT WOULD SEEM TO PROVE THAT EVIL IS NOT WITHOUT INTENTION AND THEIR SOLUTION
10
THAT EVIL IS NOT AN ESSENCE
13
8Q ARGUMENTS WHEREBY IT IS SEEMINGLY PROVED THAT EVIL IS A NATURE OR A THING AND THEIR SOLUTION
14
THAT THE CAUSE OF EVIL IS A GOOD
17
ON THE DISTINCTION OF HABITS
406
ON THE VIRTUES AS TO THEIR ESSENCE
412
ON THE SUBJECT OF VIRTUE
419
ON THE DISTINCTION OF THE INTELLECTUAL VIRTUES
429
ON THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN MORAL AND INTELLEC
440
THE DISTINCTION OF THE MORAL VIRTUES IN RELATION
449
HOW THE MORAL VIRTUES ARE DISTINGUISHED FROM
457
THE CARDINAL VIRTUES
466

THAT THE SUBJECT OF EVIL IS A GOOD
21
THAT EVIL DOES NOT ENTIRELY DESTROY GOOD
22
THAT EVIL HAS A CAUSE OF SOME KIND
23
THAT EVIL IS AN ACCIDENTAL CAUSE
24
THAT THERE IS NO HIGHEST EVIL
25
THAT THE END OF EVERYTHING IS A GOOD
26
THAT ALL THINGS ARE DIRECTED TO ONE END WHICH IS GOD
27
HOW GOD IS THE END OF THINGS
29
THAT ALL THINGS TEND TO BE LIKE UNTO GOD
30
THAT THINGS HAVE A NATURAL TENDENCY TO BE LIKE GOD INASMUCH AS HE IS A CAUSE
33
HOW THINGS ARE DIRECTED IN VARIOUS WAYS TO THEIR RE SPECTIVE ENDS
34
2S THAT THE MOVEMENT OF THE HEAVENS IS FROM AN INTEL LECTUAL PRINCIPLE
37
HOW EVEN THINGS DEVOID OF KNOWLEDGE SEEK THE GOOD
41
THAT TO KNOW GOD IS THE END OF EVERY INTELLECTUAL SUB STANCE
43
DOES HAPPINESS CONSIST IN AN ACT OF THE WILL?
47
THAT HUMAN HAPPINESS DOES NOT CONSIST IN CARNAL PLEASURES
51
THAT HAPPINESS DOES NOT CONSIST IN HONORS
53
THAT MANS HAPPINESS DOES NOT CONSIST IN GLORY
54
THAT MANS HAPPINESS DOES NOT CONSIST IN WEALTH
55
THAT HAPPINESS DOES NOT CONSIST IN WORLDLY POWER
56
THAT MANS HAPPINESS DOES NOT CONSIST IN THE KNOWL
62
MAN AND THE PROVIDENCE OF GOD CH 64113 113
64
THAT IN THIS LIFE WE ARE UNABLE TO KNOW SEPARATE SUB
69
THAT MANS ULTIMATE HAPPINESS DOES NOT CONSIST IN
76
THAT IN THIS LIFE WE ARE UNABLE TO SEE GOD IN
82
THAT THE NATURAL DESIRE OF THE SEPARATE SUBSTANCES
90
ARGUMENTS THAT WOULD SEEM TO PROVE THAT GOD CANNOT
97
THAT NO CREATED INTELLECT IN SEEING GOD SEES ALL THAT
100
THAT GOD GOVERNS ALL THINGS BY HIS PROVIDENCE
113
THAT BY MEANS OF INTELLECTUAL CREATURES OTHER CREA
145
CHAPTER 8l ON THE ORDERING OF MEN TO ONE ANOTHER AND TO OTHER
152
SULT OF NECESSITY FROM THE ACTION OF THE HEAVENLY
163
THAT THE MOVEMENT OF THE WILL AND NOT ONLY
170
IS THERE SUCH A THING AS FATE AND WHAT IS IT?
179
THAT THE WORKS OF MAGICIANS DO NOT RESULT ONLY FROM
204
ARGUMENTS THAT WOULD SEEM TO PROVE THAT THERE
213
Summa Theologica First Part of the Second Part
225
ON THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF HUMAN ACTS
239
ON THE WILL IN REGARD TO WHAT IT WILLS
245
ON THE MANNER IN WHICH THE WILL IS MOVED
259
ON ENJOYMENT WHICH IS AN ACT OF THE WILL
266
ON INTENTION
272
ON CHOICE WHICH IS AN ACT OF THE WILL IN RELATION
278
ON COUNSEL WHICH PRECEDES CHOICE
286
Q IS ON CONSENT WHICH IS AN ACT OF THE WILL IN RELA
294
ON USE WHICH IS AN ACT OF THE WILL IN RELATION
299
WHETHER THE ACT OF THE SENSITIVE APPETITE IS COM
311
ON THE GOODNESS AND MALICE OF HUMAN ACTS
317
ON THE GOODNESS AND MALICE OF THE INTERIOR
334
WHETHER THE WILL IS EVIL WHEN IT IS AT VARIANCE WITH
339
g WHETHER THE GOODNESS OF THE WILL DEPENDS ON ITS CON
346
WHETHER THE EXTERNAL ACT ADDS ANY GOODNESS OR MALICE
354
WHETHER A HUMAN ACT IS MERITORIOUS OR DEMERITORIOUS
364
HABITS VIRTUES AND VICES QQ 4989
366
Q SO ON THE SUBJECT OF HABITS
375
Q SI ON THE CAUSE OF HABITS AS TO THEIR FORMATION
386
ON THE INCREASE OF HABITS
393
Q S3 HOW HABITS ARE CORRUPTED AND DIMINISHED
400
THE THEOLOGICAL VIRTUES
475
THE CAUSE OF THE VIRTUES
481
ON THE MEAN OF VIRTUE
488
THE CONNECTION OF THE VIRTUES
495
ON EQUALITY AMONG THE VIRTUES
505
ON THE DURATION OF THE VIRTUES AFTER THIS LIFE
516
ON THE GIFTS
527
ON THE BEATITUDES
543
ON THE FRUITS OF THE HOLY GHOST
552
ON VICE AND SIN CONSIDERED IN THEMSELVES
559
ON THE DISTINCTION OF SINS
569
ON THE COMPARISON OF ONE SIN WITH ANOTHER
584
ON THE SUBJECT OF SIN
601
THE CAUSES OF SIN IN GENERAL
617
THE CAUSES OF SIN IN PARTICULAR
623
THE CAUSE OF SIN ON THE PART OF THE SENSITIVE
630
ON THAT CAUSE OF SIN WHICH IS MALICE
644
ON THE EXTERNAL CAUSES OF SIN
651
ON THE CAUSE OF SIN THE DEVIL
658
ON THE CAUSE OF SIN MAN
664
ON ORIGINAL SIN AS TO ITS ESSENCE
673
ON THE SUBJECT OF ORIGINAL SIN
679
ON THE CAUSE OF SIN IN SO FAR AS ONE SIN IS THE CAUSE
686
CONCERNING THE CORRUPTION
694
ON THE STAIN OF SIN
705
ON VENIAL AND MORTAL SIN
721
ON VENIAL SIN CONSIDERED IN ITSELF
732
XIII
742
ON THE VARIOUS KINDS OF LAW
748
ON THE EFFECTS OF LAW
758
THE NATURAL LAW
772
HUMAN LAW
782
ON THE POWER OF HUMAN LAW
790
ON CHANGE IN LAWS
800
ON THE OLD LAW
806
ON THE PRECEPTS OF THE OLD LAW
817
ON THE MORAL PRECEPTS OF THE OLD LAW
827
ON THE CEREMONIAL PRECEPTS IN THEMSELVES
853
ON THE CAUSES OF THE CEREMONIAL PRECEPTS
861
ON THE DURATION OF THE CEREMONIAL PRECEPTS
908
ON THE JUDICIAL PRECEPTS
919
Q IDS ON THE REASON FOR THE JUDICIAL PRECEPTS
926
CONSIDERED IN ITSELF
949
ON THE NEW LAW AS COMPARED WITH THE OLD
957
ON THOSE THINGS THAT ARE CONTAINED IN THE
967
GRACE
979
ON THE GRACE OF GOD AS REGARDS ITS ESSENCE
996
Q Ill ON THE DIVISION OF GRACE
1003
ON THE CAUSE OF GRACE
1012
ON THE EFFECTS OF GRACE
1020
ON MERIT WHICH IS THE EFFECT OF COOPERATING
1038
Summa Theologica Second Part of the Second Part
1055
ON THE INTERIOR ACT OF FAITH
1074
ON THE EXTERIOR ACT OF FAITH
1091
CONCERNING THOSE WHO HAVE FAITH
1108
ON THE CAUSE OF FAITH
1115
INDEX
1135
Copyright

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About the author (1997)

Thomas Aquinas, the most noted philosopher of the Middle Ages, was born near Naples, Italy, to the Count of Aquino and Theodora of Naples. As a young man he determined, in spite of family opposition to enter the new Order of Saint Dominic. He did so in 1244. Thomas Aquinas was a fairly radical Aristotelian. He rejected any form of special illumination from God in ordinary intellectual knowledge. He stated that the soul is the form of the body, the body having no form independent of that provided by the soul itself. He held that the intellect was sufficient to abstract the form of a natural object from its sensory representations and thus the intellect was sufficient in itself for natural knowledge without God's special illumination. He rejected the Averroist notion that natural reason might lead individuals correctly to conclusions that would turn out false when one takes revealed doctrine into account. Aquinas wrote more than sixty important works. The Summa Theologica is considered his greatest work. It is the doctrinal foundation for all teachings of the Roman Catholic Church.

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