Bathsheba Spooner: Incidental Remarks Made at the Annual Meeting of the American Antiquarian Society Held in Worcester, October 22, 1888, Volume 3

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Charles Hamilton, 1889 - 9 pages
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Page 6 - I wish to add another similar piece of evidence. My grandmother, the wife of the second Dr. John Green and the daughter-in-law of the first Dr. John Green and his wife (the sister of Mrs. Spooner before mentioned), stated to her daughter, Mrs. Heywood, as I learn from that lady, that her mother-in-law, Mary (Ruggles) Green, was made temporarily insane by the troubles which preceded and accompanied the trial and execution of her sister. A brother of Mrs. Heywood, the third Dr. John Green, for many...
Page 7 - The council refused to grant the petition. Then a strong effort was made to induce them to change their minds. Rev. Mr. Maccarty, the attending clergyman, sought a reprieve with great earnestness, expressing it as his firm belief that the jury of matrons was mistaken. The two men-midwives changed their minds and united with a woman midwife and Dr. Green, the brother-in-law of Mrs. Spooner, in a statement which was presented to the council to the effect that they then believed that the petitioner...
Page 3 - ... of Mrs. Spooner. It is enough to say that they rest in an unmarked grave within the bounds of the estate formerly owned by the husband of her sister Mary and occupied by him and his family. The land is still in the possession of some of Dr. Green's posterity. Mrs. Spooner was charged, as you well know, Mr. President, with being "accessory before the fact" to the murder of her husband. The ground of the defence set up for her by the first Levi Lincoln, her counsel, was that she was insane. I do...
Page 4 - The testimony of the witnesses," writes Chandler, "is derived from the notes of Judge Foster. It is not well reported, some portions being very obscure, but I have thought it best to make only slight alterations." Vol. II., p. 13, note. In writing about Mr. Lincoln's argument, Chandler says "A brief and imperfect abstract of his address to the jury is all that can now be collected.
Page 8 - ... Mrs. Spooner had been well brought up,a and her position i Chandler, Vol. II., p. 10. 2The stories of the results of domestic infelicity in her father's family have been very much exaggerated. There is not the slightest foundation for the statement that has sometimes been made that General Kuggles set his daughter an example of domestic infidelity.
Page 6 - ... prevented that impartiality of judgment of the case of Mrs. Spooner, which would have been accorded it by the undisturbed judgment of men in a calm and unprejudiced state of mind. With the state of feeling prevalent among the citizens of Massachusetts Bay in 1778 it must have been difficult for the comi Chandler, Vol. II., p. 7. munity, the jury and the executive officers of the State to have viewed the charge against Mrs. Spooner with unbiased minds. To cite only a single instance, it seems...
Page 3 - Her remains are in a grave in the northeastern portion of that place ; the exact spot where they are buried is known, I presume, to only a few of the descendants of the first Dr. John Green of Worcester, who married Mary Ruggles, a sister of Mrs. Spooner. It is enough to say that they rest in an unmarked grave within the bounds of the estate formerly owned by the husband of her sister Mary and occupied by him and his family. The land is still in the possession of some of Dr. Green's posterity. Mrs....
Page 4 - ... contended that she was crazy but that he believed her to be so. He used to instance eccentricities noticeable in her conduct at times before the murder when she came from Brookfield to Worcester. 1 "The testimony of the witnesses," writes Chandler, "is derived from the notes of Judge Poster.
Page 9 - ... of American history. I will not undertake to reproduce at length here the opinions of these gentlemen, but may return to the consideration of the whole subject at some future time and treat it more elaborately than would be proper in the Proceedings of this society. . -J...
Page 5 - ... years ago, had been hopelessly crazy for many years before her death. 1 Our associate, Mr. Robert Noxon Toppan of Cambridge, Massachusetts, who is a member of the Ruggles family, writes me that he remembers that his grandmother (the wife of Dr. Robert Noxon and the daughter of Captain Lazarus Ruggles of New Milford, Connecticut), often told him when young about General Ruggles and Mrs. Spooner, and that she always spoke of the latter us crazv.

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