Bathsua Makin, Woman of Learning

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Bucknell University Press, 1998 - Biography & Autobiography - 196 pages
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Bathsua Reginald Makin is an important figure in women's history. A child prodigy, she was thoroughly educated in classical and modern languages at a time when most women were illiterate. She was a middle-class Englishwoman who published her own poetry, established her own school, and wrote in defense of women's right to learning. Not only did she publish but she was also "a woman of great acquaintance" who sometimes acted on her own to earn a living. She enjoyed friendships with prominent Protestant families like those of Sir Simonds D'Ewes and the Raleghs; with the leaders of the English Comenian movement, like John Milton's friend Samuel Hartlib or her own brother-in-law, John Pell; and with other learned women like Anna Maria Van Schurman and Lucy, Countess of Huntingdon. She lived in poverty, yet taught a countess and a princess.
 

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I am not sure where the 1673 date came from--perhaps from one of the illustrations. But the publication's actual copyright date is 1998--which is even included in its LIBRARY OF CONGRESS NUMBER.

Contents

Acknowledgments
7
The Schoolmasters Daughter
23
The Virgin Muse
35
From East London to Westminster
46
Teaching the Princess
57
War and Worry
69
A School for Gentlewomen
80
Text of the Essay
109
Notes
151
Biographical Glossary
166
Bibliography
180
Index
191
Copyright

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Page 9 - Here am I asking why women did not write poetry in the Elizabethan age, and I am not sure how they were educated; whether they were taught to write; whether they had sitting-rooms to themselves; how many women had children before they were twenty-one; what, in short, they did from eight in the morning till eight at night.

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