Battle Grounds: The Canadian Military and Aboriginal Lands

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UBC Press, Nov 1, 2011 - History - 368 pages
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Base closures, use of airspace for weapons testing and low-level flying, environmental awareness, and Aboriginal land claims have focused attention in recent years on the use of Native lands for military training. But is the military's interest in Aboriginal lands new? Battle Grounds analyzes a century of government Aboriginal interaction and negotiation to explore how the Canadian military came to use Aboriginal lands for training. It examines what the process reveals about the larger and evolving relationship between governments and Native communities, and how increasing Aboriginal assertiveness and activism have affected the issue.
 

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Contents

Introduction
3
1 A Road to Nowhere? The Search for Sites in British Columbia 190730
13
The Militia and the Sarcee Reserve 190839
39
Imperial Flying Training at Tyendinaga 191718
64
4 The Thin Edge of a Wedge? The British Commonwealth Air Training Plan and Aboriginal Lands 194045
83
Creating Camp Ipperwash 194245
115
The Primrose Lake Air Weapons Range 195165
144
7 Into the Drivers Seat? The Department of National Defence and the Sarcee Band 194582
176
9 Closing Out the Century
230
Reflections
252
Cases in Which the Canadian Military Formally Acquired Indian Reserve Lands
264
OrderinCouncil PC 2193
266
Notes
268
Selected Bibliography
330
Index
341
Copyright

Competing Claims in the 1970s and 1980s
202

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About the author (2011)

P. Whitney Lackenbauer is an assistant professor in the Department of History at St. Jerome's University

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