Baychimo: Arctic Ghost Ship

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Heritage House Publishing Co, 2006 - History - 255 pages
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No vessel that sailed the Arctic seas has raised so much speculation or triggered imaginations as has the legendary Hudson's Bay Company ship Baychimo.

In the 1920s, Baychimo set up trading posts in eastern Canada, sailed on fur-trading expeditions to Siberia during the turbulent years of the Russian civil war and made dangerous annual voyages around Alaska to Canada's western Arctic coast, shouldering her way through ice floes to resupply the HBC's remote trading posts. Anthony Dalton digs deep to unveil the incredible tale of the hardy ship and her sometimes irascible captain, Sydney Cornwell, bringing to life the larger story of the community of northern traders, hunters and sailors of which Baychimo was a part.

This ship's story had a remarkable twist. Caught in 1931 in an ice floe that refused to let go, her crew expected her to sink at any moment, and abandoned ship. But Baychimo was as stubborn as the ice, and she floated away unharmed to begin what would prove to be the longest phase of her seemingly charmed career: for the next four decades she would appear on the horizon at unexpected times and places, always defiantly upright and afloat, becoming the legendary ghost ship of the Arctic.

 

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Contents

Introduction
13
191421
31
Service in Siberian Waters
47
Round the World to the Western Arctic
74
First Voyage into the Central Arctic 1925
100
Trading in the North 192629
127
The Northwest Passage
158
A Bad Year for Ice1931
170
Baychimo Becomes a Phantom
217
An Arctic Ghost Ship Sails On
234
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About the author (2006)

Anthony Dalton is the author of numerous books on maritime history including The Graveyard of the Pacific, The Fur-Trade Fleet, Alone against the Arctic, and Sir John Franklin. He is a fellow of both the Royal Geographical Society and the Royal Canadian Geographical Society and is past-president of the Canadian Authors Association. He lives in Tsawwassen, British Columbia.

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