Beaches: Form and process

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Springer Science & Business Media, Dec 31, 1990 - Science - 324 pages
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This book places research into worldwide beach environments in its geomorphological context. Having introduced the systems approach to environmental modelling, and identified the groups of processes operating on beaches, the text is structured in five parts: the first three sections provide a sequential account of the effects of these processes on the beach system; part four focuses on theory relevant to landform stability, then reviews existing empirical, analytical and numerical models; and the final section introduces a computer model and shows its application to the process functions developed earlier.
 

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Contents

Beaches An Introduction
3
12 The Form Problem
4
13 Parameters and Processes
5
14 Beach Geomorphology
7
15 A Hierarchy of Models
9
16 Computer Modelling
11
17 The Beach Literature
12
Beach Modelling and Monitoring
13
96 The Threshold of Suspended Load Transport
131
97 The Rate of Suspended Load Transport
132
98 Conclusions
135
Orthogonal Sediment Transport
137
103 Orthogonal Bedload Rates
142
104 Orthogonal Suspended Load Thresholds
150
105 Orthogonal Suspended Load Rates
151
106 Slope Inclusive Effects
154

22 The Orthogonal Form
16
23 The Orthogonal Processes
18
24 The Measurement of Wave Profiles
22
25 The Measurement of Orthogonal Currents
23
27 The Measurement of Orthogonal Form
24
Physical Properties of Beach Sediment
25
33 The Packing of Beach Sediments
29
34 The Porosity of Beach Sediments
30
36 The Shape of Beach Sediments
32
38 The Permeability of Beach Sediments
34
Physical Properties of Seawater
37
43 The Composition of Sea Water
39
44 The Density of Sea Water
40
45 The Surface Tension of Sea Water
41
46 The Hydrostatic Pressure of Sea Water
42
47 The Buoyancy of Particles in Sea Water
43
Shoalling Transformations
47
52 Wave Parameters
48
53 Wave Profiles
49
54 Reduction in Wave Length due to Shoaling
52
55 Increase in Waveheight due to Shoaling
54
56 Secondary Changes in Wave Height
56
57 Summary of Wave Height Changes
63
58 Random Waves
65
59 Random Wave Transformations
68
Orthogonal Currents
71
62 Oscillatory Currents
72
63 Comparison of Wave Theories
79
64 Wave Induced Drift Currents
82
65 Currents due to Random Waves
84
66 Wave Induced Boundary Layers
85
67 Conclusions
87
Longshore Currents
89
72 Wave Setup and Setdown
90
Complete Solution
91
Mid Surf Solution
95
75 Local Currents
96
76 Conclusions
98
Tides
99
82 Tide Generating Forces
100
83 Equilibrium Tide
102
84 Harmonic Analysis of Tides
105
85 Shallow Water Effects
106
86 Beach Tides
107
87 Meteorological effects
108
88 Tidal Immersion Time
109
Basic Sediment Transport
113
92 Unidirectional Flow Characteristics
114
93 Modes of Transport
115
94 The Threshold of Bedload Transport
116
95 The Rate of Bedload Transport
123
Longshore Sediment Transport
157
113 Deterministic Total Load Formulae
161
114 Cross Shore Transport Distributions
163
114 Conclusions
164
Advanced Sediment Transport
165
123 Terminal Velocity
168
Steady Drag
170
126 Discussion
186
Basic Morphodynamics
189
Temporal Solutions
191
Combined Solution
192
137 The Response Function
193
138 Relaxation Time
195
1310 System Stability and Numerical Solutions
199
Empirical Reach Models
201
143 Shoreline Gradients
203
144 Orthogonal Profiles
207
145 Erosion Models
210
146 Orthogonal Response Models
212
Analytical Beach Models
217
Inman and Bagnold 1963
218
Bowen 1980
219
Hardisty 1986
221
155 Discussion
226
Numerical Beach Models
229
162 Fleming and Hunt 1976
230
163 DavidsonArnott 1981
231
164 Dally and Dean 1984
232
165 Watanabe 1988
234
166 Martinez and Harbaugh 1989
236
167 Discussion
238
The SLOPES Model
241
173 Bathymetric Input
252
174 Wave Parameter Input
253
175 PseudoConstants
254
Process Sensitivity Analysis
255
183 Flow Process Solutions
258
184 Transformation Process Solutions
262
185 Sediment Dynamic Process Solutions
269
Parameter Sensitivity Analysis
273
194 Incident Angle Solutions
277
Time Trends Change
279
202 Iteration Time
282
204 Concluding Remarks
284
A Spectral Approach ?
286
APPENDICES
289
Trigonometric Functions
291
SLOPES formulae
293
BIBLIOGRAPHY AUTHOR INDEX
297
SUBJECT INDEX
319
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About the author (1990)

Jack Hardisty is Professor of Environmental Physics at the University of Hull with research interests in sediment flux and wave and tidal renewable energy.

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