Beadle's dime book of practical etiquette for ladies and gentlemen

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1859 - Reference - 72 pages
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Page 34 - Do not mock — the mocked may be better than the mocker." Those you condemn may not have had the same advantages as yourself in acquiring grace or dignity, while they may be infinitely superior in purity of heart and mental accomplishments. The advice of Chesterfield to his son, in his commerce with society, to do as you would be done by, is founded on the Christian precept, and worthy of commendation. Imagine yourself the victim of another's ridicule, and you will cease to indulge in a pastime...
Page 26 - Her lips will readily yield to a pleasant smile; she will not love to hear herself talk; her tones will bear the impress of sincerity, and her eyes kindle with animation as she speaks. The art of pleasing is, in truth, the very soul of good breeding: for the precise object of the latter is to render us agreeable to all with whom we associate — to make us, at the same time, esteemed and loved.
Page 27 - If you feel your intellectual superiority to any one with whom you are conversing, do not seek to bear him down ; it would be an inglorious triumph, and a breach of good manners. Beware, too, of speaking lightly of subjects which bear a sacred character.
Page 34 - ... otherwise obnoxious to censure, which is indulged in by the thoughtless, particularly among the dancers. Of its gross impropriety and vulgarity we need hardly express an opinion ; but there is such an utter disregard for the feelings of others implied in this kind of negative censorship, that we cannot forbear to warn our young readers to avoid it. The " Koran " says : " Do not mock — the mocked may be better than the mocker.
Page 62 - THE very delightful recreation and exercise of riding on horseback is too little partaken of in these days of fast locomotion. This is to be regretted, for nothing is better calculated to develop the physical health and animal spirits, nothing is more conducive to pleasure of a rational character than the ride on horseback upon every pleasant day. ETIQUETTE OF RIDING. The etiquette of riding is very exact and important. Remember that your left when in the saddle is called the near side, and your...
Page 35 - ... hands, a slight inclination of the head, in the manner of a salutation, is appropriate and becoming. Dancing is certainly supposed to be an enjoyment, but the sombre countenances of some who engage in it, might almost lead to the belief that it were a solemn duty being performed. If those who laugh in church would transfer their merriment to the assembly-room, and those who are sad in the assembly-room would carry their gravity to the church, they both might discover the appositeness of Solomon's...
Page 17 - Naturalness is an essential item in good-breeding. Hear what La Bruyere thinks on this important ^question. " Some young people do not sufficiently understand the advantages of natural charms, and how much they would gain by trusting to them entirely. They weaken these gifts of heaven, so rare and fragile, by affected manners and an awkward imitation. Their tones and their gait are borrowed ; they study their attitudes before the glass until they have lost all trace of natural manner, and, with all...
Page 49 - ... that, in truth, you hardly know your own mind on the subject. This will not excuse you. Every young woman ought to know the state of her own heart; and yet the happiness and future prospects of many an excellent man have been sacrificed by such unprincipled conduct. A POOR TRIUMPH. It is a poor triumph for a young lady to say, or to feel, that she has refused five, ten, or twenty offers of marriage; it is about the same as acknowledging herself a trifler and coquette, who, from motives of personal...
Page 51 - ... magistrate, the ceremony is almost nominal — it is a mere repetition of a vow. The Catholic and Episcopal forms have the most ceremony, and doubtless are the most impressive, though no more effectually marrying than the simplest form. GENERAL RULES. There are, however; some generally received rules which govern this momentous and interesting occasion, and to these we refer all interested. When the wedding is not strictly in private, it is customary for bridesmaids and groomsmen to be chosen...
Page 34 - There is a custom which is sometimes practiced both in the assembly room and at private parties, which cannot be too strongly reprehended ; we allude to the habit of ridicule and ungenerous criticism of those who are ungraceful or otherwise obnoxious to censure, which is indulged in by the thoughtless, particularly among the dancers. Of its gross impropriety and vulgarity we need hardly express an opinion; but there is such an utter disregard for the feelings of others implied in this kind of negative...

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