Beasts and Super-Beasts

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The Floating Press, Feb 1, 2010 - Fiction - 345 pages
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Beasts and Super-Beasts is a collection of short stories by Hector Hugh Munro, published under his literary pseudonym, Saki. The stories are each concerned in some way with a different animal, as the title suggests. Munro's style is simple, cynical and humorous.
 

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Contents

Authors Note
5
The SheWolf
6
Laura
19
The BoarPig
30
The Brogue
40
The Hen
50
The Open Window
62
The Treasure Ship
69
The Byzantine Omelette
181
The Feast of Nemesis
190
The Dreamer
198
The Quince Tree
207
The Forbidden Buzzards
215
The Stake
223
Clovis on Parental Responsibilities
231
A Holiday Task
237

The Cobweb
76
The Lull
86
The Unkindest Blow
96
The Romancers
104
The SchartzMetterklume Method
112
The Seventh Pullet
122
The Blind Spot
134
Dusk
143
A Touch of Realism
152
Cousin Teresa
164
The Yarkand Manner
172
The Stalled Ox
247
The StoryTeller
257
A Defensive Diamond
268
The Elk
276
Down Pens
286
The NameDay
294
The Lumber Room
305
Fur
316
The Philanthropist and the Happy Cat
326
On Approval
334
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About the author (2010)

H. H. Munro, better known as "Saki," was born in Burma, the son of an inspector-general for the Burmese police. Sent to England to be educated at the Bedford Grammar School, he returned to Burma in 1893 and joined the police force there. In 1896, he returned again to England and began writing first for The Westminster Gazette and then as a foreign correspondent for The Morning Post. Best known for his wry and amusing stories, Saki depicts a world of drawing rooms, garden parties, and exclusive club rooms. His short stories at their best are extraordinarily compact and cameolike, wicked and witty, with a careless cruelty and a powerful vein of supernatural fantasy. They deal, in general, with the same group of upper-class Britishers, whose frivolous lives are sometimes complicated by animals---the talking cat who reveals their treacheries in love, the pet ferret who is evil incarnate. The nom de plume "Saki" was borrowed from the cupbearer in Omar Khayyam's (see Vol. 2) The Rubaiyat. Munro used it for political sketches contributed to the Westminster Gazette as early as 1896, later collected as Alice in Westminster. The stories and novels were published between that time and the outbreak of World War I, when he enlisted as a private, scorning a commission. He died of wounds from a sniper's bullet while in a shell hole near Beaumont-Hamel. One of his characters summed up Saki's stories as those that "are true enough to be interesting and not true enough to be tiresome.

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