Beating the Deal Killers: Overcoming Murphy's Law (and other Sales Nightmares)

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McGraw Hill Professional, Sep 22, 2002 - Business & Economics - 224 pages

Strategies for overcoming clock-watching clients, spilled coffee, and other sales nightmaresand closing the sale

Selling is tough, and what can go wrong often will. Successful salespeople know they must prepare themselves for every potential deal-killer. Beating the Deal-Killers provides situation-specific advice for anticipating problems, handling them deftly, and returning everyone's attention to the matter at handcompleting the sale.

More than just a valuable troubleshooting guide, however, this book by award-winning sales executive Stephen Giglio gives sales pros firsthand techniques they can put into action at their next sales meeting. Battleproven tips and pointers include:

  • How to prepare for a relaxed yet take-charge sales call
  • Techniques, actions, and phrases for motivating a prospect
  • 10 effective ways to field objections
 

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Contents

INTRODUCTION
1
CHAPTER 1 ANATOMY OF A SALES CALL
7
CHAPTER 2 THE BEST WAY TO BEAT MURPHY
21
CHAPTER 3 LOOK OUT FOR MURPHY
40
CHAPTER 4 SOUL SEARCHING
59
CHAPTER 5 HEY HOW YA DOIN?
66
CHAPTER 6 SET THE AGENDA
77
CHAPTER 7 MURPHYS LAW ON CLIENTS
90
CHAPTER 8 THE BIG SHOW
120
CHAPTER 9 DEFENDING YOUR TURF AGAINST MURPHY
148
CHAPTER 10 CLOSES THAT CLOSE OUT MURPHY
174
CHAPTER 11 EVEN MURPHY KNOWS THAT WHEN ITS OVER ITS NOT OVER
192
INDEX
213
ABOUT THE AUTHOR
218
Copyright

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Popular passages

Page 13 - the projection of one's own personality into the personality of another in order to understand them better. The ability to share in another's emotions and feelings and thoughts.
Page 98 - Every man I meet is my superior in some way. In that, I learn of him.
Page 48 - ... the input variable. That is, producing the correct level of an input, x, is a process in its own right and must be learned. Fortunately, accumulated technological knowledge gives cookbook methods for controlling many variables. The process engineer can look it up in a catalog or handbook. This means that you do not have to "reinvent the wheel" each time; you just have to learn enough to control the variable using known "wheels.
Page 183 - A survey by a national sales executive association showed that 80 percent of all sales are made after the fifth call.

About the author (2002)

Stephen Giglio is founder and president of the Giglio Company, a sales and executive coaching consultancy whose clients include American Express, Citibank, ESPN, and other high-profile corporations. An award-winning sales professional in his own right, Giglio and his firm have helped thousands of sales professionals around the globe hone their selling skills and instincts.

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