Beauties of Sturm's Reflections: In Lessons on the Works of God and of His Providence

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Page 82 - Yea, the stork in the heaven knoweth her appointed times ; and the turtle, and the crane, and the swallow, observe the time of their coming; but my people know not the judgment of the LORD.
Page 3 - God, who, by a secret and absolute power, maintains in me, strength, motion, and existence. If my breath is not yet stopped ; if my blood still circulates ; if my limbs have not yet lost their activity ; if the organs of my senses have preserved their play ; if, in this instant, I have the faculty of thinking, and the use of my reason ; it is to God alone that I am indebted for it. But, why do I reflect so seldom, and with so little gratitude, on the daily ways of Providence ? Ought not the reflections...
Page 128 - Let us, then, examine into this phenomenon, because it is in itself very remarkable, and furnishes us with a new occasion to glorify our great Creator. The eclipse of the sun is an effect entirely natural ; it is caused by the moon passing between the earth and the sun. But it can only take place when the moon, which is an opaque body, and dark in itself, comes nearly in a direct line between the sun and our earth.
Page 246 - Author of nature has so ordained it, that all beings should be useful to one another. Let us learn hence our mutual duties. The strong should assist the weak ; the Well-informed should assist with his advice, those who want it; the learned should instruct the ignorant : indeed we should love our neighbour as ourselves, and thus fulfil...
Page 34 - What can be more delightful than to recognize, in the whole creation, in all the natural world, in every thing we see, traces of the ever-working providence and tender mercy of the great Father of all.
Page 245 - ... to his own use, becomes himself their prey. .Such is the circle in which all things here take their course, that all beings were created for one another. Tigers, lynxes, bears, and a number of other animals, provide us with skins and furs to cover us : dogs pursue the hare and the stag, to tiirnisb our tables : the terrier drives...
Page 245 - If we observe the dfferent occupations of man, we shall find that they also tend to the same end, which nature purposed. The sailor braves the dangers of the seas and storms, to convey merchandize, which does not belong...
Page 231 - Two days after the grain is put into the earth, it is swelled by the juices, and begins to shoot. The shoot is always at one of the ends of the grain: and that part of it which is next the outside of the grain is the little root of the future plant. The part turned inwards is the stalk and head of the plant. The corn, when sowed, generally begins in twenty-four hours to pierce through the coat, and unfold itself. The root and stalk become visible. The root is first wrapped up in a bag, whicli it...
Page 231 - ... is next the outside of the grain, is the little root of the future plant. The corn, when sowed, generally begins, in twenty four hours, to pierce through the coat, and unfold itself. The root and stalk become visible. The root is first wrapped up in a bag, which it bursts open. Some days after, the other roots shoot out of their sides. The fifth or sixth day, a green stalk springs up above the ground. It remains some time in that state, till the fine season comes, when the ear of corn breaks...
Page 245 - The earth itself, with its rocks and sands, its ores and its salts, owes its . origin and continuance to the elements. The trees, plants, herbs, and all the vegetables, draw their subsistence from the earth; while the animals, in their turn, feed upon the vegetables. The earth gives nourishment to the plant, the plant is food for the insect, the...

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