Becoming a Subject: Political Prisoners During the Greek Civil War

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Berghahn Books, 2002 - History - 250 pages
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Focusing on the Greek Civil War (1946-1949), the last major conflict in Europe before the end of the Cold War, this study examines the political prisoners whose fate encapsulates the dramatic conflicts and contradictions of that dark era. New sources such as prisoners' letters, memoirs, and official reports, the author describes the life of the prisoners and the effect the prison administration and the prisoners' collective had on their personality. Drawing comparisons to political prisoners in Germany and Spain, the author sheds new light on our understanding of the ideologies and policies and their effect on individuals, which marked European history in the 20th century.

 

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Contents

IV
19
V
22
VI
26
VII
33
VIII
39
IX
44
X
52
XI
54
XXVII
131
XXVIII
138
XXIX
145
XXX
146
XXXI
148
XXXII
151
XXXIII
163
XXXIV
164

XII
58
XIII
64
XIV
74
XV
75
XVI
79
XVII
83
XVIII
91
XIX
92
XX
96
XXI
100
XXII
116
XXIII
117
XXIV
120
XXV
124
XXVI
130
XXXV
169
XXXVI
173
XXXVII
182
XXXVIII
184
XXXIX
187
XL
192
XLI
199
XLII
201
XLIII
208
XLIV
212
XLV
223
XLVI
237
XLVII
246
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