Beetles in Conservation

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Wiley, Dec 18, 2009 - Science - 248 pages
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Beetles, the most diverse group of insects, are often abundant in terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems. Many species are under threat from human changes to natural environments, and some are valuable tools in conservation, because they respond rapidly to changes that occur. Knowledge of these responses, of both abundance and composition of assemblages, enable use of some beetles to monitor environmental changes. Beetles impinge on humanity on many ways: as cultural objects, desirable collectables, major pests and competitors for resources need by people, as beneficial consumers of other pests, and by ensuring the continuity of vital ecological processes. This book is the first major global overview of the importance of conservation of beetles, and brings together much hitherto scattered information to demonstrate the needs for conservation, and how it may be approached. It is a source of value to students, research workers, conservation biologists and ecosystem managers as an introduction to the richness and importance of this predominant component of invertebrate life.

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About the author (2009)

Tim New is Emeritus Professor in Zoology at La Trobe University , Melbourne. His entomological interests include many aspects of systematics, ecology and conservation, and he is acknowledged as one of the leading advocates for insect conservation. He has published widely in this field, and has travelled widely to look at insects and talk about them in many parts of the world.

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