Beginning Logic

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CRC Press, Sep 30, 1971 - Mathematics - 240 pages
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The aim of this book is to provide an exposition of elementary formal logic. The course, which is primarily intended for first-year students who have no previous knowledge of the subject, forms a working basis for more advanced reading and is presented in such a way as to be intelligible to the layman. The nature of logic is examined with the gradual introduction of worked samples showing how to distinguish the sound statement from the unsound. Arguments whose soundness cannot be proved by propositional calculus are discussed, and it is shown how formalization can reveal the logical form of arguments. The final section of the book deals with the application of the predicate calculus as applied in various other fields of logic.
 

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User Review  - tinncan - LibraryThing

Looks like a good introduction to the subject, but really dry and there's no way I'll manage to plough through it without actually doing some kind of course on logic! Read full review

Contents

THE PROPOSITIONAL CALCULUS 2
42
THE PREDICATE CALCULUS 1
92
THE PREDICATE CALCULUS 2
138
Appendix A Normal forms
189
Appendix B The elementary theory of classes
201
Bibliography
211
Index
217
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