Beginning Writing 1

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Saddleback Educational Publ, Sep 1, 2008 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 100 pages
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There is no such thing as too much writing practice. These two-part binder programs build skills incrementally from bright idea to polished final product. These stimulating lessons will enable students to actually enjoy the writing process. Includes Traits of Writing correlation. Topics Include: Pre-writing, Brainstorming, Grammar Basics, Rewriting Fragments and Run-Ons, Choosing Precise Adjectives and Adverbs, Linking Relating Thoughts, and more...
 

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Contents

Personal Experiences
52
Brainstorming
53
Tone Formal or Informal?
54
Deciding on Point of View
55
Deciding on Verb Tense
56
LAUGH OUT LOUD Misplaced and Dangling Modifiers
57
Review
58
The Friendly Letter
59

Conjunctions
9
Adjectives
10
Choosing Appropriate Adjectives
11
Adverbs
12
Adverbs That Tell How When and Where
13
Choosing Appropriate Adverbs
14
Prepositions
15
Interjections
16
LAUGH OUT LOUD Misused Homonyms
17
Review
18
A Complete Thought
19
Four Kinds of Sentences
20
Compound Subjects
21
Compound Predicates
22
Using Phrases
23
Using Clauses
24
Using Direct and Indirect Objects
25
LAUGH OUT LOUD Misplaced Modifiers Dangling Phrases
26
Review
27
Avoiding and Correcting Fragments I
28
Avoiding and Correcting Fragments II
29
RunOns I
30
RunOns II
31
Parallel Elements
32
Inverted Sentences
33
Active and Passive Verbs
34
LAUGH OUT LOUD Malapropisms Ludicrous Misuse of Words
35
Review
36
Stating the Main Idea
37
Using Relevant Details
38
Using Facts and Examples
39
Comparing and Contrasting
40
Cause and Effect
41
Putting Detail Sentences in Order
42
Using Transitions
43
Review
44
Determining Purpose
45
Narrowing Your Topic
46
Writing to Persuade
47
Writing to Inform
48
Writing to Describe
49
Writing to Instruct How To
50
Personal Interests
51
ThankYou Letters
60
Sending Messages
61
The Business Letter
62
Addressing an Envelope
63
LAUGH OUT LOUD Misused Words
64
Review
65
Expanding Sentences
66
Using Your Senses
67
Haiku
68
Writing About Pictures
69
Writing About People
70
LAUGH OUT LOUD Whats in a Name?
71
Review
72
Spelling Demons
73
Double Trouble
74
Letters Often Left Out
75
Capitalization I
76
Capitalization II
77
Commas I
78
Commas II
79
Punctuating Quotations I
80
Punctuating Quotations II
81
Unnecessary Repetition
82
Double Negatives
83
Proofreaders Marks
84
LAUGH OUT LOUD Misspelled Words
85
Review
86
Sentence Variety I Varying Sentence Beginnings
87
Sentence Variety II Combining Sentences
88
Sentence Variety III Avoiding And Sentences
89
Concise Writing
90
Avoiding Mixed Comparisons
91
Recognizing Facts and Opinions
92
Qualifying Opinions
93
Making and Qualifying Generalizations
94
Word Choices
95
New Beginnings
96
Effective Endings
97
Writing Titles
98
LAUGH OUT LOUD Headline Horrors
99
Review
100
Copyright

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Page 87 - Synonyms A synonym is a word that means the same or nearly the same as another word. Example: mean and cruel. Directions: Circle the word or group of words in each sentence that is a synonym for a word in the box. Write the synonym from the box on the line. The first one has been done for you. 1 . The children seemed to(fhrjye)in their new school.
Page 6 - A PRONOUN is a word that takes the place of a noun ; as " He reads," " She studies," " It falls." AN ADJECTIVE is a word used to describe a noun; as '•'•sweet cider," "educated people,
Page 1 - A common noun names any person, place, thing, or idea. A proper noun names a specific person, place, thing, or idea.
Page 24 - A clause is a group of related words that contains a subject and predicate and is part of the main sentence.
Page 86 - ... or what the sentence is about. A subject is either a common noun, a proper noun or a pronoun. Examples: Sue went to the store. Sue is the subject of the sentence. The tired boys and girls walked home slowly. The tired boys and girls is the subject of the sentence. Directions: Underline the subject of each sentence. The first one has been done for you. 1. The birthday cake was pink and white. 2. Anthony celebrated his fourth birthday. 3. The tower of building blocks fell over. 4. On Saturday,...
Page 15 - A preposition is used to show the relationship of a noun or pronoun to another word in the sentence.
Page 57 - Winfield goes back to the wall. He hits his head on the wall and it rolls off! It's rolling all the way back to second base! This is a terrible thing for the Padres! Jerry Coleman, San Diego Padres announcer Azinger is wearing an all-black outfit: black jumper, blue trousers, white shoes and a pink "tea-cosy
Page 19 - A sentence is a complete thought and makes sense on its own. It begins with a capital letter and ends with an end mark (period, question mark, or exclamation point).

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