Behavioral Aspects of Pediatric Burns

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Kenneth J. Tarnowski
Springer Science & Business Media, Sep 30, 1994 - Psychology - 281 pages
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In recent years, considerable professional attention has centered on the behavioral aspects of various childhood illnesses and injuries. Indeed, child health psychology has grown exponentially over the past decade. One index of this growth is found in the number of texts that have recently appeared in the area (Gross & Drabman, 1990; Karoly, 1988; Krasnegor, Arasteh, & Cataldo, 1986; Levine, Carey, Crocker, & Gross, 1982; Routh, 1988; Russo & Varni, 1982; Tuma, 1982; Varni, 1983). In general, these texts provide summaries of the psychological literature across a variety of established (e.g., oncology) and emerging (psychoneuroimmunology) areas of child health. Until recently, many books on the psychological aspects of pediatric health provided no or minimal information about the psychosocial plight of child burn victims. In some instances, pediatric burns might be men tioned parenthetically as another example of a population for which behavioral treatment procedures (e. g., pain management) may be of value. In part, the relative inattention devoted to this population may be related to the perception that the literature in this area is sketchy and charac terized by significant methodological and substantive shortcomings. In many instances, this perception is largely justified. However, it is also the case that the pediatric burn literature has evolved considerably over the past decade and that the incidence of, and morbidity associated, with severe burn injuries mandates immediate and increased attention by mental health professionals.
 

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Contents

Overview
1
Book Organization and Contents
15
Historical Aspects of Burn Treatment
28
Inhalation Injury
40
TissueCultured Skin
46
Acute Reactions
55
Common Acute BehavioralPsychological Problems
64
References
75
Pharmacological Approaches
159
References
165
The External
171
Physical Interventions in BodyImage Rehabilitation
180
Summary and Conclusion
187
Family Considerations and Interventions
193
Concluding Comments
212
Psychosocial Adjustment of the Burned Child
218

LongTerm Psychosocial Sequelae
81
Family Studies
93
Concluding Comments
108
References
114
Assessment Issues
123
Case Study
139
Pain Management
147
Assessment
152
Presentation of Generic Burn Information
225
Practical Issues
232
Summary
238
Models
244
Summary
260
General Conclusions and Commentary
266
The Majority of Pediatric Burn Injuries Are Preventable
273
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Page 276 - MC, & Wolraich, M. (1993). Society of Pediatric Psychology Task Force Report: Pediatric psychology and injury control. Journal of Pediatric Psychology, 18, 499-526.

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