Behavioral Interventions with Brain-Injured Children

Front Cover
Springer Science & Business Media, 1994 - Psychology - 216 pages
0 Reviews
This is the first volume to integrate neuropsychology and behavior therapy into a comprehensive, cohesive assessment and treatment methodology. Of particular value is a discussion of how to integrate multiple sources of information and criteria for selecting treatment techniques. The work will appeal to a wide audience including neuropsychologists, neurologists, psychiatrists, clinical psychologists, and special educators.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction to Behavioral Interventions with BrainDamaged Children
1
DEFINING BEHAVIORAL NEUROPSYCHOLOGY
3
LESSONS OF DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY
4
NEUROPSYCHOLOGICAL FACTORS
5
Organicity
6
NEUROLOGICAL DEVELOPMENT ISSUES
9
DIAGNOSTIC ISSUES
12
Organic Mental Syndromes and Disorders as Defined by the DSMIIIR
14
TREATMENT ISSUES
90
BEHAVIOR MANAGEMENT
92
TREATMENT RECOMMENDATIONS
93
SUCCESSFUL TECHNIQUES
94
SUMMARY
98
REFERENCES
99
Treatment Procedures with WILLIAM G MILLER
101
General Orientation
102

DEVELOPMENTALLY LINKED DISORDERS
17
EVOLVING DIRECTIONS IN CHILD NEUROPSYCHOLOGY
19
Professional Issues
21
Research Issues
22
SUMMARY
24
BrainBehavior Relationships with WILLIAM G MILLER
29
Hindbrain
30
Thalamus
31
LURIAS MODEL OF BRAIN FUNCTIONING
34
Functional Systems
35
HEMISPHERIC LATERALIZATION OF FUNCTION
37
Hemispheric Abilities
38
SPECIFIC FUNCTIONS OF CEREBRAL LOBES
40
Temporal Lobes
41
Occipital Lobes
42
RECOVERY OF FUNCTION AFTER CHILDHOOD CEREBRAL TRAUMA
43
NEUROPSYCHOLOGICAL RECOVERY
44
NEUROPSYCHOLOGICAL PATTERNS
45
THE SPECIAL CASE OF HEAD INJURY IN CHILDREN
46
SUMMARY
47
REFERENCES
48
Comprehensive Assessment with WILLIAM G MILLER
51
INTERVIEW ASSESSMENT
52
Parent Interviewing
53
DIRECT OBSERVATION
54
BEHAVIOR RATING SCALES
55
Conners Teacher Rating Scale
56
LuriaNebraska Neuropsychological BatteryChildrens Revision
64
Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children
72
SUMMARY
75
REFERENCES
76
Treatment Planning with WILLIAM G MILLER
83
TREATMENT PLANNING GUIDELINES
84
RECOVERY PATTERNS IN CHILDREN
89
Problem Definition and Formulation
103
Verification
104
SelfStatement Types
105
BEHAVIOR CONTINGENCIES
106
Defining the Target Behavior
107
Behavioral Assessment
108
PROCEDURES FOR INCREASING A BEHAVIOR
109
Instructional Strategies
110
Motivational Strategies
111
DECREASING BEHAVIOR
114
Reinforcement
115
Punishment
118
Extinction
121
SUMMARY
122
REFERENCES
123
Treatment Outcome
125
RESEARCH ISSUES
131
TREATMENT ISSUES
136
ASSESSMENT ISSUES
138
RESEARCH DESIGN ISSUES
143
SUMMARY
146
REFERENCES
147
SingleSubject Research Design with WILLIAM G MILLER
151
REVERSAL DESIGN
152
MULTIPLEBASELINE DESIGN
153
CHANGINGCRITERION DESIGN
156
ALTERNATINGTREATMENT DESIGN
158
STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF SINGLESUBJECT DESIGNS
160
REFERENCES
161
Case Studies
163
INTRODUCTION TO ED
165
SUMMARY
207
Index
209
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

About the author (1994)

Arthur MacNeill Horton, Jr., is in independent practice as Director of the Neuropsychology Clinic at Psych Associates of Maryland in Towson, Columbia and Bethesda, Maryland and consults on neuropsychology and drug abuse research issues.. He holds Diplomates in Clinical Psychology and Behavioral Psychology from the American Board of Professional Psychology and in Neuropsychology from the American Board of Professional Neuropsychology. Dr. Horton is the author/editor of over 15 books, more than 30 book chapters, and over 150 journal articles. He is a past-president of the American Board of Professional Neuropsychology, a doctoral-level certification board in neuropsychology, the Coalition of Clinical Practitioners in Neuropsychology (CCPN), and the National Academy of Neuropsychology (NAN). In addition, Dr. Horton was a member of the State of Maryland Board of Examiners of Psychologists for two terms. He recently co-authored The Test of Verbal Conceptualization and Fluency (TVCF), a measure of executive functions in children, adults, and the elderly.

Bibliographic information