Behaviour, Crime and Legal Processes: A Guide for Forensic Practitioners

Front Cover
James McGuire, Tom Mason, Aisling O'Kane
Wiley, Oct 3, 2000 - Psychology - 336 pages
0 Reviews
Areas of professional practice, such as law, psychiatry, and the behavioural and social sciences, overlap at numerous points in terms of underlying concepts and basic research. They also intersect at an everyday level in their work with individuals whose multiple problems simultaneously require attention from legal, mental health, and social services professionals. Behaviour, Crime and Legal Processes explicitly sets out to close the gaps between the professions. It addresses the questions that arise at the meeting–points and cross–roads of different backgrounds and spheres of activity, thereby helping people working in these different fields to grasp the nature and implications of each other′s perspectives and adopt a better–informed approach to inter–disciplinary work.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Obstacle or Opportunity?
19
Psychology and Police Investigation
39
Factors Influencing Witness Evidence
65
Copyright

10 other sections not shown

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2000)

Mary McMurran is consultant clinical and forensic psychologist at Llanarth Court Hospital, Wales, and Senior Research Fellow in the School of Psychology, Cardiff University. She has worked with offenders in a young offenders centre, a maximum-security psychiatric hospital, a regional secure unit, and in the community. In 1999, she was awarded a five-year Senior Baxter Research Fellowship by the National Health Service's National Programme on Forensic Mental Health Research and Development. Her research interests are the assessment and treatment of intoxicated aggression, social problem-solving therapy for personality disordered offenders, and understanding and enhancing offenders' motivation to change. She is the author, with Philip Priestley, of Addressing Substance-Related Offending (ASRO), an accredited group treatment programme used in HM Prison and Probation Services, and Control of Violence for Angry Impulsive Drinkers (COVAID), an individual treatment programme. She is a Fellow of the British Psychological Society and former Chair of the Society's Division of Forensic Psychology. She is founding editor, with Sally Lloyd-Bostock, of the journal Legal & Criminological Psychology, and is joint editor of Criminal Behaviour and Mental Health. She is a former member of the Scottish Prison Service's Offender Treatment Programme Accreditation Panel, and is currently a member of Her Majesty's Prison and Probation Services Correctional Services Accreditation Panel.

James McGuire is Professor of Forensic Clinical Psychology at the University of Liverpool, UK, Director of Studies for the Doctorate in Clinical Psychology programme, and an honorary consultant clinical psychologist inMersey Care NHS Trust. A chartered clinical and forensic psychologist, he carries out psycholegal work involving assessment of offenders and has prepared reports on young offenders charged with offences of violence, for hearings of the Mental Health Review Tribunal on adults detained in secure hospitals, and for the Criminal Cases Review Commission. He has conducted research in prisons, probation services, and other settings on aspects of the effectiveness of treatment with offenders and allied topics. He has engaged in a range of consultative work with criminal justice agencies in the United Kingdom, Sweden, Canada, Australia and Hong Kong. He was co-organizer of the What Works series of conferences, and has written or edited 12 books and numerous other publications on this and related areas.

Tom Mason has been working in nursing for almost 30 years - 17 of those in clinical practice, the remainder in teaching and research.

He has published nine books and over 70 journal articles, and was awarded the International Association of Forensic Nurse's Achievement Award in 1999.

His main professional interests are the management of violence in healthcare settings, and the sociology of nursing.

Tom is currently Professor of Forensic Nursing at the Caswell Clinic, South Wales, and external professor at the University of Glamorgan. He is also visiting professor at Chester College of Higher Education.

Bibliographic information