Behavioural and Morphological Asymmetries in Amphibians and Reptiles: Proceedings of the 4th World Congress of Herpetology Satellite Symposium

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Psychology Press, 2002 - Psychology - 299 pages
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Lateralization of brain and behaviour is now considered a common feature for all vertebrates, from agnathans and fish to birds and mammals. An important place in this field of research is occupied by amphibians and reptiles - the key classes to understand evolution of lateralization of behaviour and its relations to structure and development. This special issue of Laterality comprises a collection of papers, presented at the International Symposium on Behavioural and Morphological Asymmetries in Amphibians and Reptiles - the first of its kind. This is the first attempt to integrate and overview the works in the young field of study of lateralization in herpetological subjects, which is only about five years old. The issue is focused on amphibians (as reptiles are less involved so far) and specifically on the relations of behavioural and morphological directional asymmetries. It might serve as a starting point for future meetings and raise a number of evolutionary and developmental questions, directing the ways of prospective research. The issue consists of six review and original papers written by invited experts in the field. It provides references to almost all the available literature on the subject. Being a 'state-of-the-art' book, the issue is suitable for both advanced students and researchers specializing in behavioural sciences, neuroscience, developmental biology and morphology, who might wish to join the study of asymmetry in lower tetrapods for deeper insights into its evolution, development and function.
 

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Contents

Section 1
193
Section 2
200
Section 3
227
Section 4
231
Section 5
289
Section 6
291
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About the author (2002)

Lesley J. Rogers is Emeritus Professor at the Centre for Neuroscience and Animal Behaviour, University of New England, Armidale, Australia. A Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science, she has made outstanding contributions to understanding brain development and behaviour, including the discovery of lateralization in the chick forebrain at a time when lateralization was thought to be unique to humans. Her publications, numbering over 450, include 16 books and over 200 scientific papers and book chapters, mainly in the field of brain and behaviour with a focus on development and lateralization. She has received a number of awards for excellence in research, including a Special Investigator Award from the Australian Research Council, an Australian Centenary Medal, and the Clarke Medal from the Royal Society of New South Wales.

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