Behind the Urals: an American worker in Russia's city of steel

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Indiana University Press, 1978 - Social Science - 279 pages
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"Students reading Scott have come away with a real appreciation of the hardships under which these workers built Magnitogorsk and of the nearly incredible enthusiasm with which many of them worked." -- Ronald Grigor Suny "A genuine grassroots account of Soviet life -- a type of book of which there have been far too few." -- William Henry Chamberlin, New York Times, 1943 ..". a rich portrait of daily life under Stalin." -- New York Times Book Review General readers, students, and specialists alike will find much of relevance for understanding today's Soviet Union in this new edition of John Scott's vivid exploration of daily life in the formative days of Stalinism.

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User Review  - DavenportsDream - LibraryThing

An absolutely fascinating portrayal of the sacrifices made in Russia following the Bolshevik revolution to make the country into an industrial powerhouse. John Scott's book details the the work he did ... Read full review

Contents

PART ONH Blood Sweat and Tears
3
PART THREE The Story of Magnitogorsk
55
PART FOUR A Trip Through Stalins Ural Stronghold
95
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About the author (1978)

John Scott is Professor of Sociology at the University of Essex. An active member of the British Sociological Association, he served as its President from 2001 until 2003. He has written more than fifteen books, including Corporate Business and Capitalist Classes (1997), Social Network Analysis (1991 and 2000), Sociological Theory (1995), and Power (2001). With James Fulcher he is the author of the leading introductory textbook Sociology (1999 and 2003). He is a member of the Editorial Board of the British Journal of Sociology and is an Academician of the Academy of Learned Societies in the Social Sciences.