Behold the Gathering Clouds: Soul Visions II

Front Cover
AuthorHouse, Oct 1, 2002 - Literary Criticism - 328 pages
0 Reviews

James Melvin Scott's book, The Missouri Kid, chronicles the life of a boy growing up in the Missouri Ozarks. While his parents, who were farmers, didn't have much--very few families did--they provided their four children with a rich childhood in an environment surrounded by nature. Missouri is a network of great rivers and magnificent streams. Scott grew up hunting and fishing on the rivers and in the Ozark Hills of Missouri. Scott's story takes you through his early years, through his youth when he played high school basketball and was a cowboy in the rodeo, and into adulthood when he eventually left Missouri and crossed the Grand Canyon rim-to-rim with a friend as he headed out West, to California, to pursue the American dream.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Love Me
1
In Search Of Love
7
Always Together Again
14
An American Blight
21
Forever in the Light of Love
27
Behold My Distant Heart
32
Not Anymore
38
Have
44
When Liberty Happens
125
The Poetry In My Soul
140
Children Read
154
The Reckoning
167
The Iguana
177
Aids That Plague or Curse
184
Dark Days Are Coming
190
Wake Up African Man
196

Talk to Me
50
Hear Rhythms
56
My Passion Dancer
62
Lazarus Prince Celebrated
68
When Moses Came To Gershom
75
Man In Confusion With Satan
81
David Of Jonathans Death
87
Jeremiahs Weeping Call
93
In The Twilight Of Eden
99
Am A Screaming Eagle
108
Hear A Distant Drum
114
The Duels
121
A Light is Gone From the World
202
What now my Purpose
208
Black Life Blossoming
214
Living Well
220
Venice Jewel Of Italy
227
The Black Mass1672 a d
241
George Washington Remembers
255
Black Eternal Slave
269
Ah Now Petronius
282
The Fall of Thebes
284
Once in Waterloo
298
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2002)

Bell, Trinidadian born, is an educator, playwright, historian, and poet, who believes that writers should look deeply into people and conditions, and attempt to expose new, positive ideas.

Bibliographic information