Being Church 101

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Cross Books Publishing, 2009 - Religion - 156 pages
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Churches across the country hold a variety of individuals. There are those who "play church" with the goal of being entertained, some who "do church" like checking off a to-do list, and others who avoid church all together. The modern church faces the same lax of character the church of Corinth encountered in the first century. In his first letter to the Corinthians, the Apostle Paul urged Christians to step up and "be the church."

The church of Corinth was corrupt, divided and faced overwhelming immoral obstacles. The Apostle Paul addressed these issues and challenged the Corinthians to have more of an affect within their community rather than being affected by worldly desires.

Dr. Mark Hearn draws from Paul's profound letter in Being Church 101 where he tackles such themes as church divisions, deterioration of the family unit, disorderly worship services, immorality, and doctrinal differences. Dr. Hearn's accessible style and knowledge of scripture sheds light on how Christians can live extraordinary and enriched lives while making an even greater impact within our communities.

 

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About the author (2009)

Known for his poignant teaching and heart for ministry, Dr. Mark Hearn has served as senior pastor within Southern Baptist churches across the country for 28 years. Currently he is the pastor of Northside Baptist Church, which is the largest Southern Baptist church in Indianapolis.Dr. Hearn has served in the past as adjunct professor of Evangelism and Discipleship at both Crossroads Bible College in Indianapolis and Oklahoma Baptist University. He is also the former president of the State Convention of Baptists in Indiana and past first vice president of the Georgia Baptist Convention. He is a graduate of Carson-Newman Collage (BA), Southern Baptist Theological Seminary (M. Div.) and Luther Rice Seminary (D. Min.).He and his wife, Glenda, have four grown daughters and three grandsons.

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