Being Homeless: Textual and Narrative Constructions

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Lexington Books, 2003 - Psychology - 181 pages
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Being Homeless presents the stories of homelessness as told from the perspectives of the clients, staff, and a researcher at an emergency shelter. Drawing on in-depth interviews, shelter documents, and historical analysis, the author provides ethnographic data that demonstrate the variety of the experiences and the attitudes of homeless people. This study underscores the necessity for a more comprehensive response to the needs of this group. Being Homeless offers insights, both practical and theoretical, of value to human service providers as well as sociologists.
 

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Contents

A Brief History of Homelessness
9
The Constructive Demography of Homelessness
21
Literary Constructions of Homelessness
35
Ethnographic Constructions of Homelessness
45
Abbot House and Its Clients
61
The Local Demography of Homeless Clients
75
Staff Constructions of the Client
89
Narrative Practice and the Interactive Dynamics of Client Work
119
Client Constructions of the Shelter and Homelessness
143
The Lessons of Narrativity
169
Selected Bibliography
173
Index
179
About the Author
183
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About the author (2003)

Amir Marvasti is a Visiting Assistant Professor of Sociology at Penn State Altoona.

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