Being Wrong: Adventures in the Margin of Error

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Harper Collins, Jan 4, 2011 - Psychology - 416 pages
10 Reviews

To err is human. Yet most of us go through life assuming (and sometimes insisting) that we are right about nearly everything, from the origins of the universe to how to load the dishwasher. In Being Wrong, journalist Kathryn Schulz explores why we find it so gratifying to be right and so maddening to be mistaken. Drawing on thinkers as varied as Augustine, Darwin, Freud, Gertrude Stein, Alan Greenspan, and Groucho Marx, she shows that error is both a given and a gift—one that can transform our worldviews, our relationships, and ourselves.

 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Cheryl_in_CC_NV - LibraryThing

Ok, I'm not done yet, and I will finish, but I've struggled with one of Schulz's major premises and in order to be able to read the rest of the book I have to say now: One cannot be wrong" about ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - LynnB - LibraryThing

This book is an interesting, often amusing, look at being wrong. What makes us wrong? Why do we so often experience negative feeling when we make mistakes? Ms. Shulz's argument is that we should ... Read full review

Contents

II
3
III
25
IV
45
V
47
VI
67
VII
87
VIII
111
IX
133
XII
183
XIII
201
XIV
220
XV
247
XVI
273
XVII
297
XVIII
299
XIX
320

X
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XI
181

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About the author (2011)

Kathryn Schulz is a journalist whose work has appeared in the New York Times Magazine, Rolling Stone, Foreign Policy, the Nation, the Boston Globe, and the "Freakonomics" blog of the New York Times. She lives in New York's Hudson Valley.

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