Being a Brain-Wise Therapist: A Practical Guide to Interpersonal Neurobiology (Norton Series on Interpersonal Neurobiology)

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W. W. Norton & Company, Jul 17, 2008 - Psychology - 348 pages
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This book, part of the acclaimed Norton Series on Interpersonal Neurobiology, brings interpersonal neurobiology into the counseling room, weaving the concepts of neurobiology into the ever-changing flow of therapy.

Neuroscientific discoveries have begun to illuminate the workings of the active brain in intricate detail. In fact, sometimes it seems that in order to be a cutting-edge therapist, not only do you need knowledge of traditional psychotherapeutic models, but a solid understanding of the role the brain plays as well. But theory is never enough. You also need to know how to apply the theories to work with actual clients during sessions.

In easy-to-understand prose, Being a Brain-Wise Therapist reviews the basic principles about brain structure, function, and development, and explains the neurobiological correlates of some familiar diagnostic categories. You will learn how to make theory come to life in the midst of clinical work, so that the principles of interpersonal neurobiology can be applied to a range of patients and issues, such as couples, teens, and children, and those dealing with depression, anxiety, and other disorders. Liberal use of exercises and case histories enliven the material and make this an essential guide for seamlessly integrating the latest neuroscientific research into your therapeutic practice.
 

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A Must for Professional Clinicians-Psych Science

User Review  - santamonicareader - Borders

This book is a must for all college level clinical psychology classes. Bonnie Badenoch gives us a window into sessions with her mastery of Interpersonal Neurobiology. This book is one of the most useful books for clinicians. Read full review

Contents

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Page 322 - Magnetic resonance imaging-based measurement of hippocampal volume in posttraumatic stress disorder related to childhood physical and sexual abuse — a preliminary report.
Page 328 - Demonstration in vivo of reduced serotonin responsivity in the brain of untreated depressed patients. Am J Psychiatry 153:174-182.
Page 321 - EC & Courchesne. E. (1997): Attentional activation of the cerebellum independent of motor involvement. Science 275. 1940-1943.
Page 321 - Baird, AA, Gruber, SA, Fein, DA, Maas, LC, Steingard, RJ, Renshaw, PF, Cohen, BM, & Yurgelun-Todd, DA (1999). Functional magnetic resonance imaging of facial affect recognition in children and adolescents. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 38(2), 195-199.
Page 329 - Tancer, ME (2005). Neural substrates for voluntary suppression of negative affect: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

About the author (2008)

Bonnie Badenoch, MA, LMFT, is a marriage and family therapist, an instructor at Portland State University in the Interpersonal Neurobiology certificate program, and cofounder and executive director of the nonprofit Nurturing the Heart with the Brain In Mind in Vancouver, WA.

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