Believing in a Revealing God: The Basis of the Christian Life

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Liturgical Press, 2009 - Religion - 194 pages
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What is faith? Is it a thing one has or a human activity? What is revelation? Is it a deposit of truths in the past or God's action in the present?

These questions are addressed by renowned religious educator Gabriel Moran, who draws upon biblical and theological traditions set within today's interreligious dialogue. A church of moral and liturgical activity in relation to a revealing God is the needed response to both a dismissal of religion and apocalyptic violence in its name. The future role of Christianity in the world and in individual lives may well hang in the balance: The Christian ideas of faith and revelation will either be the chief obstacle to dialogue with the contemporary world or else the main foundation to a Christian spiritual life that can give substance and direction to religious searching.

Gabriel Moran is a professor in the Department of Humanities and the Social Sciences at New York University. He is widely credited with reshaping the field of religious education in the United States and beyond. Moran is author of twenty books on religion and education, including Religious Education as a Second Language; Both Sides: The Story of Revelation and, most recently, Speaking of Teaching: Lessons from History.

 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Chapter
15
Chapter
37
Chapter Three
61
Chapter Four
83
Chapter Five
105
Chapter
127
Chapter Seven
151
Bibliography
173
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Gabriel Moran is a professor in the Department of Humanities and the Social Sciences at New York University. He is widely credited with reshaping the field of religious education in the United States and beyond. Moran is author of twenty books on religion and education, including Religious Education as a Second Language; Both Sides: The Story of Revelation and, most recently, Speaking of Teaching: Lessons from History.

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