Bell's British Theatre, Consisting of the Most Esteemed English Plays...: Comediès

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J. Bell; & C. Etherington, 1777 - English drama
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Page 31 - Haste thee, Nymph, and bring with thee Jest, and youthful Jollity, Quips and cranks, and wanton wiles, Nods and becks, and wreathed smiles, Such as hang on Hebe's cheek, And love to live in dimple sleek ; Sport that wrinkled Care derides, And Laughter holding both his sides.
Page 39 - How happy could I be with either, Were t'other dear Charmer away!
Page 11 - The star that bids the shepherd fold Now the top of heaven doth hold; And the gilded car of Day His glowing axle doth allay In the steep Atlantic stream...
Page 44 - But now my task is smoothly done, I can fly, or I can run, Quickly to the green earth's end, Where the bow'd welkin slow doth bend, And from thence can soar as soon To the corners of the moon.
Page 13 - Such as the jocund flute, or gamesome pipe, Stirs up among the loose unletter'd hinds, When, for their teeming flocks, and granges full, In wanton dance they praise the bounteous Pan, And thank the gods amiss.
Page 8 - A noble peer of mickle trust and power Has in his charge, with temper'd awe to guide An old and haughty nation proud in arms : Where his fair offspring, nurs'd in princely lore, Are coming to attend their father's state And new-intrusted sceptre.
Page 14 - I wish nae mair of a' that's rare. My Peggy speaks sae sweetly, To a' the lave I'm cauld; But she gars a' my spirits glow, At wauking of the fauld. My Peggy smiles sae kindly, Whene'er I whisper love. That I look down on a' the town, — That I look down upon a crown.
Page 15 - And in sweet madness robb'd it of itself; But such a sacred, and home-felt delight, Such sober certainty of waking bliss I never heard till now.
Page 18 - Oh, ponder well! be not severe; So save a wretched Wife ! For on the Rope that hangs my Dear Depends poor Polly's Life.
Page 38 - That in their green shops weave the smooth-hair'd silk, To deck her sons ; and, that no corner might Be vacant of her plenty, in her own loins She hutch'd the all-worshipp'd ore and precious gems, To store her children with : if all the world Should, in a pet of temperance, feed on pulse...

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