Belle Assemblée: Or, Court and Fashionable Magazine; Containing Interesting and Original Literature, and Records of the Beau-monde

Forsideomslag
J. Bell, 1825
 

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Side 12 - Under the Greenwood Tree Under the greenwood tree Who loves to lie with me, And turn his merry note Unto the sweet bird's throat, Come hither, come hither, come hither: Here shall he see No enemy But winter and rough weather. Who doth ambition shun And loves to live i...
Side 250 - And he went up from thence unto Beth-el: and as he was going up by the way, there came forth little children out of the city, and mocked him, and said unto him, "Go up, thou bald head...
Side 2 - O Woman ! in our hours of ease, Uncertain, coy, and hard to please, And variable as the shade By the light quivering aspen made, When pain and anguish wring the brow, A ministering angel thou ! — Scarce were the piteous accents said, When, with the Baron's casque, the maid To the nigh streamlet ran.
Side 234 - That day she was dressed in white silk, bordered with pearls of the size of beans, and over it a mantle of black silk, shot with silver threads. Her train was very long, the end of it borne by a marchioness; instead of a chain, she had an oblong collar of gold and jewels.
Side 60 - London dead : Much good, some ill, he did ; so hope all's even, And that his soul through mercy's gone to heaven.
Side 234 - Her bosom was uncovered, as all the English ladies have it till they marry; and she had on a necklace of exceeding fine jewels; her hands were small, her fingers long, and her stature neither tall nor low; her air was stately, her manner of speaking mild and obliging.
Side 234 - That Day she was dressed in white Silk, bordered with Pearls of the Size of Beans, and over it a Mantle of black Silk, shot with Silver Threads; her Train was very long, the End of it borne by a Marchioness; instead of a Chain, she had an oblong Collar of Gold and Jewels.
Side 59 - ... thine own distress With accurate greediness) Of every past delight : — Of all his winning ways, His pretty playful smiles, His joy at sight of thee, His tricks, his mimicry, And all his little wiles ! Oh ! these are recollections Round mothers' hearts that cling ; That mingle with the tears And smiles of after years, With oft awakening.
Side 260 - tis lovely ! Childhood's lip and cheek, Mantling beneath its earnest brow of thought ! Gaze — yet what seest thou in those fair, and meek, And fragile things, as...
Side 60 - And that his soul through mercy's gone to heaven ! You that survive and read this tale, take care For this most certain exit to prepare, Where blest in peace, the actions of the just Smell sweet, and blossom in the silent dust.

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