Belmondo Style

Front Cover
Macmillan, Apr 17, 2004 - Fiction - 288 pages
1 Review
Jared Chiziver is a single father and professional pick-pocket, devotee of Jean-Paul Belmondo and foreign films, and a suave ladies' man. His son Ben is sixteen, a bookish semi-introvert, a star on his school's track team, college bound and gay. Their unusual but quiet and affectionate life in New York City's Greenwich Village is ripped asunder by two singular events. First, Jared finally meets 'the one,' Anna, a photographer of criminals and death scenes - a woman he finds endless engaging. Second, in response to a brutal attack upon his son Ben, Jared breaks his own cardinal rule and commits the big crime, the one that draws the unflinching attention of the police. The only response possible to these events is to leave New York one step ahead of the police and embark upon a journey of both escape and discovery that will irrevocably change their lives.

Told from the point of view of the too-wise and too-adult Ben, Belmondo Style is an unforgettable tale which movingly explores the bonds between an unusual father and a remarkable son.
 

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Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
9
Section 3
19
Section 4
27
Section 5
37
Section 6
47
Section 7
54
Section 8
65
Section 18
155
Section 19
161
Section 20
163
Section 21
170
Section 22
173
Section 23
191
Section 24
193
Section 25
211

Section 9
75
Section 10
84
Section 11
85
Section 12
93
Section 13
105
Section 14
113
Section 15
121
Section 16
131
Section 17
133
Section 26
214
Section 27
221
Section 28
241
Section 29
253
Section 30
259
Section 31
269
Section 32
280
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Adam Berlin is the author of the novel Headlock. His stories and poems have been published in numerous journals including the Notre Dame Review, Bilingual Review, Greensboro Review, Northwest Review, Washington Square and Other Voices. He received his MFA from Brooklyn College, teaches writing at Columbia University and John Jay College of Criminal Justice, and lives in Manhattan.

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