Benjamin Banneker

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Lerner Publications, Jan 1, 2008 - Juvenile Nonfiction - 48 pages
True or False? Benjamin Banneker used a telescope and mathematics to predict a solar eclipse. True! In 1789, Banneker calculated when the moon would pass between the earth and sun. And he did it without any formal math or science training. As a young boy, he worked on the farm owned by his father, who was a freed slave in Maryland. He helped to survey and plot out the site for the U.S. capital city, Washington, D.C. He also published several almanacs that helped farmers, merchants, and sailors predict the weather and know the dates of holidays and festivals.
 

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Contents

Introduction
5
Family and Chores
6
Neighbors Work and Study
14
Stargazing
21
Bannekers Almanacs
32
Fears and Dreams
39
Timeline
44
Digging Up Bannekers Homesite
45
Further ReadingWebsites
46
Select Bibliography
47
IndexPhoto Acknowledgments
48
Back Cover
50
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Catherine A. Welch is an award-winning author with more than 20 books to her credit and is a writing instructor with the Institute of Children's Literature. Elementary teachers have found her two short historical fiction books especially useful in the classroom. A teaching strategy for her book, Clouds of Terror , an NCSS/CBC Notable Children's Trade Book in the Field of Social Studies, appeared in Instructor (October 1995). A four-day lesson plan for Danger at the Breaker , her book praised by School Library Journal and Booklist, appears at teachers.net. While many of her works are biographies and history books, her writing credits include several science books. She has degrees in biology and biochemistry, and enjoys giving writing workshops to children and teachers.

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